devolution

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dev·o·lu·tion

 (dĕv′ə-lo͞o′shən, dē′və-)
n.
1. A passing down or descent through successive stages of time or a process.
2. Transference, as of rights or qualities, to a successor.
3. Delegation of authority or duties to a subordinate or substitute.
4. A transfer of powers from a central government to local units.
5. Biology Degeneration.

[Late Latin dēvolūtiō, dēvolūtiōn-, from Latin dēvolūtus, past participle of dēvolvere, to roll down, fall to; see devolve.]

dev′o·lu′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.
dev′o·lu′tion·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

devolution

(ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən)
n
1. the act, fact, or result of devolving
2. a passing onwards or downwards from one stage to another
3. (Biology) another word for degeneration3
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a transfer or allocation of authority, esp from a central government to regional governments or particular interests
[C16: from Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō a rolling down, from Latin dēvolvere to roll down, sink into; see devolve]
ˌdevoˈlutionary adj
ˌdevoˈlutionist n, adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dev•o•lu•tion

(ˌdɛv əˈlu ʃən; esp. Brit. ˈdi və-)

n.
1. the act or fact of devolving; passage onward from stage to stage.
2. the passing on to a successor of property or an unexercised right.
3. disappearance or simplification of structure or function in the course of evolution.
4. the transfer of power or authority from a central government to a local government.
[1535–45; (< Middle French) < Medieval Latin dēvolūtiō; see devolve, revolution]
dev`o•lu′tion•ar′y, adj., n.
dev`o•lu′tion•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

devolution

- A passing down from stage to stage or the passing of property, rights, or authority from one person to another; it implies moving backward.
See also related terms for rights.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

devolution

The transfer of power from a central government to smaller units such as regional authorities.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.devolution - the process of declining from a higher to a lower level of effective power or vitality or essential quality
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
attack - the onset of a corrosive or destructive process (as by a chemical agent); "the film was sensitive to attack by acids"; "open to attack by the elements"
obsolescence - the process of becoming obsolete; falling into disuse or becoming out of date; "a policy of planned obsolescence"
macular degeneration - eye disease caused by degeneration of the cells of the macula lutea and results in blurred vision; can cause blindness
evolution, development - a process in which something passes by degrees to a different stage (especially a more advanced or mature stage); "the development of his ideas took many years"; "the evolution of Greek civilization"; "the slow development of her skill as a writer"
2.devolution - the delegation of authority (especially from a central to a regional government)
governing, government activity, government, governance, administration - the act of governing; exercising authority; "regulations for the governing of state prisons"; "he had considerable experience of government"
delegating, relegating, relegation, delegation, deputation - authorizing subordinates to make certain decisions
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

devolution

noun transfer of power, decentralization, distribution of power, surrender of power, relinquishment of power We are talking about devolution for Scotland.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] Ndelegación f (de poderes) (Pol) → traspaso m de competencias (Brit) (Pol) → descentralización f
most Welsh people want devolutionla mayoría de los galeses quieren la autonomía
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

devolution

[ˌdɛvəˈluːʃən ˌdiːvəˈluːʃən] ndécentralisation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

devolution

n
(of power)Übertragung f (→ from … to von … auf +acc); (Pol) → Dezentralisierung f
(Jur, of property, = active devolving) → Übertragung f; (= being devolved)Übergang m
(Biol) → Rückentwicklung f, → Degeneration f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

devolution

[ˌdiːvəˈluːʃn] n (Pol) → decentramento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dev·o·lu·tion

n. devolución. V.: catabolism
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Drakeford, speaking at the Scottish Labour Party conference in Dundee yesterday, stressed that Labour was a "dedicated devolutionist party".
Colleague Jayne Bryant AM said: "Paul was a passionate devolutionist. Undoubtedly, Paul spoke truth to power."
I WRITE as a disillusioned devolutionist. Devolution was never meant to be a back door to independence.
The preceding does not take the devoted devolutionist Mark Mothersbaugh and his possible tonal machinations on the aforementioned project into account.
The second part, with three papers, is concerned with Wales between 1885 and 1939: 'devolutionist tendencies', Welsh 'national identity' and the 'dilemmas of nation and class in Wales' between 1914 and 1945.
Riverside MP Louise Ellman, Merseyside's arch devolutionist, said: ``The people of the north west had their say and the people of the north west should have the same opportunity.
Law enforcement, of course, is not the only area where this devolutionist myth - that local officials, as a rule, are better managers - falls down.
Smith, a proud devolutionist, would have been delighted to see a Scottish Parliament with a proud track record today celebrating its 15th birthday.
He writes in A Journey: "I was never a passionate devolutionist.
He said: "The DUP is openly and eagerly a devolutionist party.