devout


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de·vout

 (dĭ-vout′)
adj. de·vout·er, de·vout·est
1.
a. Devoted to a religion or to the fulfillment of religious obligations: a devout Catholic.
b. Characterized by religious devotion or piety: devout observance of the holy days.
2.
a. Fervently believing in or advocating an ideology or position: a devout socialist.
b. Fervent or earnest: devout wishes for their success.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dēvōtus, past participle of dēvovēre, to vow; see devote.]

de·vout′ly adv.
de·vout′ness n.

devout

(dɪˈvaʊt)
adj
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) deeply religious; reverent
2. sincere; earnest; heartfelt: a devout confession.
[C13: from Old French devot, from Late Latin dēvōtus, from Latin: faithful; see devote]
deˈvoutly adv
deˈvoutness n

de•vout

(dɪˈvaʊt)

adj. , -er, -est.
1. devoted to divine worship or service; pious; religious.
2. expressing piety: devout prayer.
3. earnest; fervent.
[1175–1225; < Anglo-French, Old French devo(u)t < Late Latin dēvotus, Latin: devoted]
de•vout′ly, adv.
de•vout′ness, n.
syn: See religious.

devout

, devote - Devout and devote come from Latin de- and vovere, "promise."
See also related terms for promise.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.devout - deeply religious; "a god-fearing and law-abiding people" H.L.Mencken
religious - having or showing belief in and reverence for a deity; "a religious man"; "religious attitude"
2.devout - earnest; "one's dearest wish"; "devout wishes for their success"; "heartfelt condolences"
sincere - open and genuine; not deceitful; "he was a good man, decent and sincere"; "felt sincere regret that they were leaving"; "sincere friendship"

devout

adjective
2. sincere, serious, deep, earnest, genuine, devoted, intense, passionate, profound, ardent, fervent, heartfelt, zealous, dinkum (Austral & N.Z. informal) a devout opponent of racism
sincere passive, indifferent

devout

adjective
Deeply concerned with God and the beliefs and practice of religion:
Translations
تَقي، وَرِعمُخْلِص، قَلْبي
upřímnýzbožný
fromgudfrygtiginderlig
einlægur, hjartanlegurguîhræddur
pamaldus
dievbijīgspatiesssirsnīgs

devout

[dɪˈvaʊt] ADJ
1. (Rel) [Christian, Muslim, Methodist, etc] → devoto
they're very devoutson muy devotos or piadosos
she's a devout Catholices muy católica
2. (= fervent) [Communist] → convencido; [supporter] → ferviente; [thanks, prayer] → sincero
it was his devout wish that his son should become a lawyerdeseaba de todo corazón que su hijo se hiciese abogado

devout

[dɪˈvaʊt] adjpieux/euse, dévot(e)
a devout Catholic → un catholique dévot

devout

adj person, Christian, Muslimfromm; Christianity, Catholicism, Marxist, environmentalist, followerüberzeugt; supportertreu; opponenteingeschworen; it was my father’s devout wish/hope that …es war der inständige Wunsch/die sehnliche Hoffnung meines Vaters, dass …, mein Vater wünschte sich inständig/hoffte sehnlich, dass …
n the devoutdie Frommen

devout

[dɪˈvaʊt] adj (person) → devoto/a, pio/a; (prayer, hope) → devoto/a, fervido/a

devout

(diˈvaut) adjective
1. earnest or sincere. Please accept my devout thanks.
2. religious. a devout Christian.
References in classic literature ?
As devout Eckerman lifted the linen sheet from the naked corpse of Goethe, he was overwhelmed with the massive chest of the man, that seemed as a Roman triumphal arch.
To persons of my devout turn of mind she is an awful warning.
I remember with devout thankfulness that I can never be much nearer parting company with my readers for ever, than I was then, until there shall be written against my life, the two words with which I have this day closed this book:--THE END.
They looked at one another, wondering at Don Quixote's words; but, though uncertain, they were inclined to believe him, and one of the signs by which they came to the conclusion he was dying was this so sudden and complete return to his senses after having been mad; for to the words already quoted he added much more, so well expressed, so devout, and so rational, as to banish all doubt and convince them that he was sound of mind.
The reader travelling in Italy, or Belgium perhaps, has doubtless visited one or more of those spacious sacristies, introduced to which for the inspection of some more than usually recherche work of art, one is presently dominated by their reverend quiet: simple people coming and going there, devout, or at least on devout business, with half-pitched voices, not without touches of kindly humour, in what seems to express like a picture the most genial side, midway between the altar and the home, of the ecclesiastical life.
Here she was received with devout, though decent joy, by her expecting bridegroom.
a sort of cassock, were recognizable as attached to some devout sisterhood.
Between him and his mother was the most perfect sympathy, for secretly the lady was herself a devout disciple of the late and great Myron Bayne, though with the tact so generally and justly admired in her sex (despite the hardy calumniators who insist that it is essentially the same thing as cunning) she had always taken care to conceal her weakness from all eyes but those of him who shared it.
But Nancy's Sunday thoughts were rarely quite out of keeping with the devout and reverential intention implied by the book spread open before her.
Malmesbury had made her his best bow; Walpole had pronounced her charming; Devonshire had been almost jealous of her; but she was scared by the wild pleasures and gaieties of the society into which she was flung, and after she had borne a couple of sons, shrank away into a life of devout seclusion.
It is true that this people has a natural disposition to goodness; they are very liberal of their alms, they much frequent their churches, and are very studious to adorn them; they practise fasting and other mortifications, and notwithstanding their separation from the Roman Church, and the corruptions which have crept into their faith, yet retain in a great measure the devout fervour of the primitive Christians.
Almost every devout admirer of the old bards, if demanded his opinion of their productions, would mention vaguely, yet with perfect sincerity, a sense of dreamy, wild, indefinite, and he would perhaps say, indefinable delight; on being required to point out the source of this so shadowy pleasure, he would be apt to speak of the quaint in phraseology and in general handling.