diable

di·ab·le

 (dē-ä′blə)
adj.
Flavored with hot spices: sauce diable.

[French (à la) diable, from diable, devil, from Old French; see diablerie.]

diable

(diːˈɑːblə)
n
(Cookery) a type of brown sauce, typically made with wine, shallots, vinegar, herbs, and black and/or cayenne pepper
References in classic literature ?
And when he had said it for the tenth time, Molibre's words: "Mais que diable alloit-il faire dans cette galere?
Have you heard the Maltishtcheva woman--the mother, not the daughter--has ordered a costume in diable rose color?
Do you observe," said the Countess G to Albert, who had returned to her side, "that man does nothing like other people; he listens most devoutly to the third act of `Robert le Diable,' and when the fourth begins, takes his departure.
Tu m'as plus l'air d'un ennemi de la France; arrete ou pardieu je te ferai ami du diable.
diable, no, Meester Deeck,” replied the Frenchman; “we give, in France, no liberty except to the ladi.
Otherwise known as: English Mandrake, Navet du Diable
The South Wirral side ran out 5-1 victors thanks to strikes from Dave Forbes (2), Jack Lloyd, Robb Marrs and Carl Diable.
In addition to "Le voyage dans la lune," the program included "Le diable au couvent," (The Devil in the Convent) 1899, "Nouvelles luttes extravagantes," (New extravagant struggles) 1900, "Voyage a travers l'impossible" (The Impossible Voyage), 1904, "Les quatre cents farces du diable" (The 400 Tricks of the Devil), 1906, "Deux cent mille lieues sous les mers" (Under the Seas), 1907 and "Eclipse du soleil en pleine lune," (Eclipse of the Sun in Full Moon) 1907.
C ontre vents et marees, la jeunesse du PPS se demene comme un beau diable, en Russie ou le Festival Mondial des Jeunes et des Etudiants (FMJE) a lieu, en presence de plus de 150 pays dont le Maroc.
We had this weird dish called Victorian diable, which was made from leftover roast beef with a gravy sauce made with capers.
beaucoup moins que] Le diable est cependant dans les details [beaucoup plus grand que].