diable

di·ab·le

 (dē-ä′blə)
adj.
Flavored with hot spices: sauce diable.

[French (à la) diable, from diable, devil, from Old French; see diablerie.]

diable

(diːˈɑːblə)
n
(Cookery) a type of brown sauce, typically made with wine, shallots, vinegar, herbs, and black and/or cayenne pepper
References in classic literature ?
And when he had said it for the tenth time, Molibre's words: "Mais que diable alloit-il faire dans cette galere?" occurred to him, and he began to laugh at himself.
"Have you heard the Maltishtcheva woman--the mother, not the daughter--has ordered a costume in diable rose color?"
"Do you observe," said the Countess G to Albert, who had returned to her side, "that man does nothing like other people; he listens most devoutly to the third act of `Robert le Diable,' and when the fourth begins, takes his departure."
"Ah, diable!" said the host to himself; "this man seems dumb.
Que diable! To think of a blanc bec like yourself challenging a person like the Baron to a duel!
"Diable! the exception is annoying; but then, if instead of asking him for money, you were to ask "
"Tu m'as plus l'air d'un ennemi de la France; arrete ou pardieu je te ferai ami du diable. Non!
diable, no, Meester Deeck,” replied the Frenchman; “we give, in France, no liberty except to the ladi.”
" Diable! your housekeeper is right; rather more than faded."
The gelding has taken well to fences and can improve after seeing off solid yardstick Diable De Sivola in a hot novice event at Exeter.