diacritic


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diacritic

A diacritic (or diacritical mark) is a mark added to a letter, usually to indicate a specific pronunciation of that letter.
Of the various languages using the Latin alphabet, English is one of the few that generally does not use diacritical marks. Those words that do contain them are typically foreign loanwords whose diacritics have been retained in English. The most common of these that appear in English are known as accents (either acute, as in café, or grave, as in vis-à-vis).
There are, however, a few diacritics that are used in native English words.
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diacritic
common diacritics

di·a·crit·ic

 (dī′ə-krĭt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Diacritical.
2. Medicine Diagnostic or distinctive.
n.
A mark, such as the cedilla of façade or the acute accent of résumé, added to a letter to indicate a special phonetic value or distinguish words that are otherwise graphically identical.

[Greek diakritikos, distinguishing, from diakritos, distinguished, from diakrīnein, to distinguish : dia-, apart; see dia- + krīnein, to separate; see krei- in Indo-European roots.]

diacritic

(ˌdaɪəˈkrɪtɪk)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) Also called: diacritical mark a sign placed above or below a character or letter to indicate that it has a different phonetic value, is stressed, or for some other reason
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) another word for diacritical
[C17: from Greek diakritikos serving to distinguish, from diakrinein, from dia- + krinein to separate]

di•a•crit•ic

(ˌdaɪ əˈkrɪt ɪk)

n.
1. Also called diacrit′ical mark′. a mark, point, or sign, as a cedilla, tilde, circumflex, or macron, added or attached to a letter, as to distinguish it from another of similar form, to give it a particular phonetic value, or to indicate stress.
adj.
2. diacritical.
3. diagnostic.
[1670–80; < Greek diakritikós separating]

diacritic

- From Greek diakrinein, "distinguish from," it denotes marks or signs that distinguish different values or sounds (pronunciations) of a letter.
See also related terms for signs.

diacritic

A mark attached to a letter to show a modification of sound or stress.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diacritic - a mark added to a letter to indicate a special pronunciation
mark - a written or printed symbol (as for punctuation); "his answer was just a punctuation mark"
accent mark, accent - a diacritical mark used to indicate stress or placed above a vowel to indicate a special pronunciation
breve - a diacritical mark (U-shaped) placed over a vowel to indicate a short sound
cedilla - a diacritical mark (,) placed below the letter c to indicate that it is pronounced as an s
circumflex - a diacritical mark (^) placed above a vowel in some languages to indicate a special phonetic quality
hacek, wedge - a diacritical mark (an inverted circumflex) placed above certain letters (such as the letter c) to indicate pronunciation
macron - a diacritical mark (-) placed above a vowel to indicate a long sound
tilde - a diacritical mark (~) placed over the letter n in Spanish to indicate a palatal nasal sound or over a vowel in Portuguese to indicate nasalization
diaeresis, dieresis, umlaut - a diacritical mark (two dots) placed over a vowel in German to indicate a change in sound
Adj.1.diacritic - capable of distinguishing; "students having superior diacritic powers"; "the diacritic elements in culture"- S.F.Nadel
discriminating - showing or indicating careful judgment and discernment especially in matters of taste; "the discriminating eye of the connoisseur"
Translations

diacritic

[ˌdaɪəˈkrɪtɪk]
A. ADJdiacrítico
B. Nsigno m diacrítico

diacritic

adjdiakritisch

diacritic

[ˌdaɪəˈkrɪtɪk] nsegno diacritico
References in periodicals archive ?
The doubling of a letter, such as the 'r' in the popular name Khurram, is not normally indicated either, the diacritic indicator being familiarly called tashdeed.
Selkirt (1986, p.21), formalizes the Percolation principle thus: "If a constituent [alpha] is the head of a constituent [beta], [alpha] and [beta] are associated with an identical set of features (syntactic and diacritic)"
On the other hand, immunosuppressive therapy given for lupus tends to worsen HIV infection.1 It is well documented that HIV infection can mimic the presentation of autoimmune disorders, although there have been various conflicting reports on how exactly HIV infection affects the course and prognosis of diseases like DLE.2 We report a diacritic case of an HIV-infected patient, who developed extensive DLE.
With its sweeping tails, loops, and punctuated diacritic dots, it's difficult to imagine any other language more suited to the transcription of human body movement into written language.
For example, when they use words like khuda or khatam, they use it without putting the right phonetic or nuqta (a diacritic mark to represent sound) as we say in Urdu.
There's a hint of John Donne as she finds a crushed midge in 'the hinged spread' of her complete works of Shakespeare and reflects on a 'fly's errant diacritic' which, by 'shifting the sense, might 'launch a war for a millennium.' Howe's debut collection is to be published in 2015 by Chatto & Windus.
Both .cymru and .wales will be bilingual and allow the registration of names with the diacritic marks used in the Welsh language.
The unvoiced /g/ is nearly identical to an unaspirated /k/, but using the [??] symbol with the voiceless diacritic relates more directly to the phoneme /g/.
The archaic Kufic consisted of about 17 letters, without diacritic dots or accents.
Using classical Arabic books with diacritic marks will be very helpful in developing more accurate speech recognition systems for the Arabic language.
With the full Unicode support the new version allows importing information in any languages, since it can store Roman and Cyrillic characters, hieroglyphs, umlaut symbols, and other diacritic marks in a single database.
I also question the absence of diacritic signs (Joao rather than Joao) and the omission of most personal and geographical names from the index.