dialect geography


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Related to dialect geography: dialectological, dialectologist

dialect geography

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dialect geography

n
(Linguistics) another term for linguistic geography
dialect geographer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

linguis′tic geog′raphy


n.
the study of regional variation in a language or dialect.
[1925–30]
linguis′tic geog′rapher, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dialect geography

the study of dialects with regard to their geographic distribution, as well as how their distribution may be affected by geography, e.g., the spread of a particular dialect being halted at a mountain range, forest belt, body of water, etc.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dialect geography - the study of the geographical distribution of linguistic features
linguistics - the scientific study of language
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the introduction, Gzella mentions two approaches to language change: the historical method and dialect geography. He, however, does not elaborate on the exact genealogical tree of the Central Semitic languages, an omission that makes it difficult for the reader to understand what was the original relationship between the various Semitic languages represented in this small volume.
This will allow the suitability of onomastic evidence in dialect study to be further evaluated, while adding to our knowledge of ME dialect geography through the investigation of a new source.
"Mapping the Words" emphasizes the origin of current historical dialectology (the Linguistic Atlases of Late Mediaeval English and Early Middle English) in dialect geography and provides a historiography of the subject, investigating again (with the benefit of his current research project with Linne Mooney) some of the earlier claims of its scholars (Doyle, Parkes, Samuels, etc.) in relation, for example, to Gower, Chaucer and the London dialect.
Linguistic change and diffusion: description and explanation in sociolinguistic dialect geography. Language in Society 3, 215-246.
Andrus Saareste introduced dialect geography to Estonia already in the 1920s and compiled several Estonian dialect atlases starting from the late thirties.