diamorphine


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diamorphine

(ˌdaɪəˈmɔːfiːn)
n
1. (Recreational Drugs) a technical name for heroin
2. (Pharmacology) a technical name for heroin
Translations

diamorphine

[ˌdaɪəˈmɔːfiːn] Ndiamorfina f
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pannir, 32 was convicted on June 27, 2017 by the Singapore High Court of allegedly trafficking in 51.84g of diamorphine at the Woodlands Checkpoint on September 3, 2014 despite consistently pleading innocence.
He became agitated and was given diamorphine to quieten him.
Family members spoke out after the inquiry revealed health chiefs ignored a series of warnings about the "institutionalised practice" of prescribing powerful opioids such as diamorphine.
The following cases were heard at Cardiff Magistrates' Court: | Carl Richard Melbourne, 35, from Oakwood Estate in Maesteg, admitted possessing the Class A drug diamorphine. He was found guilty of possessing a bread knife, a serrated blade, a black-handled knife and an axe in a public place.
Contract notice: NHS Framework Agreement for the supply of Generic Pharmaceuticals Co-Amoxiclav and Diamorphine Injection.
A case of accidental administration of high dose intrathecal diamorphine is reported in a patient who underwent total knee replacement.
Rasul was charged with possession of 161 miligrammes of diamorphine and a quantity of skunk cannabis on May 23 last year.
The prosecution had alleged during a four-day trial that he had injected Anthony Williams with a potentially fatal amount of pure diamorphine which Smallman obtained on prescription.
On Saturday police said Ms Roberts, 32, had been charged with conspiracy to supply Class A drug crack cocaine, conspiracy to supply a Class B controlled drug and possession of Class A drug diamorphine. She has also been charged with possession of ammunition for a firearm without a certifi-cate.
Ashley Wood, 21, of Fountains Close, L4, charged with burglary, possession of diamorphine - community order with six week electric curfew from 8pm to 7am, supervision and 100 hours unpaid work.
Nurses, pharmacists and midwives with the right experience and who have completed additional post-registration training, will be permitted to prescribe Schedule 2, 3, 4 and 5 controlled drugs, which include morphine, diamorphine (heroin) and prescription-strength co-codamol.
Dr Nagra also questioned why Mr Nagra was given the powerful pain-killer diamorphine - which has been linked to patient deaths elsewhere - in his final hours.