diaphysis

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di·aph·y·sis

 (dī-ăf′ĭ-sĭs)
n. pl. di·aph·y·ses (-sēz′) Anatomy
The shaft of a long bone.

[Greek diaphusis, spinous process of the tibia, from diaphuesthai, to grow between : dia-, dia- + phuesthai, to grow, middle voice of phuein; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

di′a·phys′i·al (dī′ə-fĭz′ē-əl), di·aph′y·se′al (dī-ăf′ĭ-sē′əl, dī′ə-fĭz′ē-əl) adj.

diaphysis

(daɪˈæfɪsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
(Anatomy) the shaft of a long bone. Compare epiphysis
[C19: New Latin, from Greek diaphusis, from diaphuesthai to grow between, from dia- + phuein to produce]
diaphysial, diaphyseal adj

di•aph•y•sis

(daɪˈæf ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
the shaft of a long bone.
[1825–35; < New Latin < Greek, =diaphý(esthai) to grow between]
di`a•phys′i•al, di`a•phys′e•al (-əˈfɪz i əl) adj.

diaphysis

the shaft section of a long bone. — diaphytical, adj.
See also: Bones
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diaphysis - the main (mid) section of a long bonediaphysis - the main (mid) section of a long bone
long bone, os longum - in limbs of vertebrate animals: a long cylindrical bone that contains marrow
Translations

di·aph·y·sis

n. diáfisis, porción media de un hueso largo tal como se presenta en el húmero.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the representation of fetal postcranial bones and additional cranial fragments was not inconsistent with two individuals, other than the humerus (with three unsided humeral diaphyses being documented), the generally poor condition of these remains did not allow duplication among them to be conclusively demonstrated, nor for additional measurements to be taken (Table 2).
Nuclear bone scan images showed nonspecific multifocal increased radiotracer uptake involving the scapulae, left forearm, hips, and femoral diaphyses (Figure 2).
Manual reaming of femoral and tibial canals under direct vision with x-ray control ensured safety and provided a pressfit cementless fixation with fluted stems in the diaphyses.
Lesser bone loss in diaphyses than in epiphyses is a consistent feature in previous reports [13,20,29].
X-rays revealed periosteal thickening of the long bones, from the epiphyses to the metaphyses but sparing the diaphyses (Figure 3).
Epiphyses of the mammoth from Fain Ranch Locality were absent, except for the proximal epiphysis of the radius, signifying that fusion of the diaphyses and epiphyses had not occurred at time of death.
6-9) As the name suggests, there is progressive hyperostosis and predominant involvement of the diaphyses.