diasporic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Di·as·po·ra

 (dī-ăs′pər-ə)
n.
1. The dispersion of Jews outside of Israel from the sixth century bc, when they were exiled to Babylonia, until the present time.
2. often diaspora The body of Jews or Jewish communities outside Palestine or modern Israel.
3. diaspora
a. A dispersion of a people from their original homeland.
b. The community formed by such a people: "the glutinous dish known throughout the [West African] diaspora as ... fufu" (Jonell Nash).
4. diaspora A dispersion of an originally homogeneous entity, such as a language or culture: "the diaspora of English into several mutually incomprehensible languages" (Randolph Quirk).

[Greek diasporā, dispersion, from diaspeirein, to spread about : dia-, apart; see dia- + speirein, to sow, scatter; see sper- in Indo-European roots.]

di·as′po·ric, di·as′po·ral adj.

diasporic

(daɪˈæspərɪk)
adj
of or relating to a (or the) Diaspora
References in periodicals archive ?
Synopsis: "Senegal Abroad: Linguistic Borders, Racial Formations, and Diasporic Imaginaries" by Maya Angela Smith (Assistant Professor of French and Italian studies at the University of Washington) explores the fascinating role of language in national, transnational, postcolonial, racial, and migrant identities.
Both Muslim and European: Diasporic and Migrant Identities of Bosniaks
Moreover, tolerance and solidarity among people of deferent races in the United States can only become more meaningful if Diasporic African people begin by uniting amongst themselves.
'The 2018 Dhahan Prize winners are well recognized for their creative works, representing the three Punjabs- East, West and Diasporic. The themes and stories are relevant and timely contributions in understanding the past and fast changing cultures in the global village,' said Barj S.
Drawing food, literary criticism, and his own experiences as a writer of South Asian descent into the text, Naben Ruthnum explores the archetypes and mythologies of the Indian subcontinent that are perpetuated by the expectation of diasporic literature.
Precarious Passages: The Diasporic Imagination in Contemporary Black Anglophone Fiction.
Kacyzne's images, Zemel argues, "deserve less tendentious readings that set aside the aura of impending doom and are grounded instead in the diasporic and nationalist context of those interwar years."
Gandhi's time in South Africa (1893-1914) as merely preparation for the movement he would later lead in India, Nalini Natarajan makes a persuasive case for understanding his diasporic sojourns abroad as the transformative foundation for his mature sociopolitical position.
Ethnic and diasporic media (2) in the form of newspapers, television, and radio have long played this important role of connecting migratory communities and providing a stable forum for the sharing of information and resources.
Market Aesthetics: The Purchase of the Past in Caribbean Diasporic Fiction.
The global movement of peoples has resulted in the formation of several diasporic communities that over the years have significantly enriched the cultural landscape of the country.
Diasporic Feminist Theology: Asia and Theopolitical Imagination.