diastolic pressure


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diastolic pressure

n.
The lowest arterial blood pressure reached when the ventricles are relaxed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diastolic pressure - the blood pressure (as measured by a sphygmomanometer) after the contraction of the heart while the chambers of the heart refill with blood
blood pressure - the pressure of the circulating blood against the walls of the blood vessels; results from the systole of the left ventricle of the heart; sometimes measured for a quick evaluation of a person's health; "adult blood pressure is considered normal at 120/80 where the first number is the systolic pressure and the second is the diastolic pressure"
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2003, a panel appointed to the Seventh Joint National Committee (JNC7) defined hypertension as a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg or higher or a diastolic pressure of 90 mmHg or higher.
Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers representing the systolic pressure and diastolic pressure.
It is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg) and is given as two figures: Systolic pressure - the pressure when your heart pushes blood out Diastolic pressure - the pressure when your heart rests between beats.
The researchers found that systolic pressure was nearly 23MMHG lower after 30 minutes than it was in a one-off reading, and the diastolic pressure was nearly 12MMHG lower than the one-off mean diastolic pressure.
Aortic out flow, coronary effluent, cardiac output, dP/dt(max), dP/dt(min), systolic and diastolic pressure, heart rate, and aortic pressure were measured.
12 mm Hg, and their diastolic pressure (the bottom number) by more than 5 mm Hg.
More than 70 million people in the United States have hypertension, which is considered systolic pressure above 140 and diastolic pressure of 90.
Currently available variables include heartbeats per minute, systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, respiration rate, Sp[O.
The US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) considers normal a systolic pressure of less than 120 mm Hg and a diastolic pressure of less than 80 mmHg.
After two months, systolic blood pressure dropped by an impressive 7 points and diastolic pressure fell by 5 points in the freeze-dried-blueberry eaters, but neither budged in those who got the imitation blueberry.
When diastolic pressure of at least 90 mm Hg declined in that group by 8 points, 76 events would be prevented.
Tables 2-5 show the percentiles constructed for systolic pressure and diastolic pressure by gender, height, weight and BMI.