diatom


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to diatom: diatomaceous earth

di·a·tom

 (dī′ə-tŏm′)
n.
Any of various microscopic one-celled or colonial heterokonts of the class Bacillariophyceae that are photosynthetic, have a silica cell wall made up of two interlocking parts, and form an important component of phytoplankton.

[New Latin diatoma, from Greek diatomos, cut in half, from diatemnein, to cut in half : dia-, dia- + temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

diatom

(ˈdaɪətəm; -ˌtɒm)
n
(Microbiology) any microscopic unicellular alga of the phylum Bacillariophyta, occurring in marine or fresh water singly or in colonies, each cell having a cell wall made of two halves and impregnated with silica. See also diatomite
[C19: from New Latin Diatoma (genus name), from Greek diatomos cut in two, from diatemnein to cut through, from dia- + temnein to cut]

di•a•tom

(ˈdaɪ ə təm, -ˌtɒm)

n.
any of numerous mostly marine algae of the class Bacillariophyceae (phylum Chrysophyta), each one-celled alga being enclosed in an intricately patterned double shell of silica, one shell fitting over the other like a box lid.
[1835–45; < New Latin Diatoma orig. a genus name, feminine n. based on Greek diátomos cut in two. See dia-, -tome]

di·a·tom

(dī′ə-tŏm′)
Any of various microscopic one-celled algae that live in water, have hard shells composed mostly of silica, and often live in colonies. Diatom shells are made of two symmetrical parts called valves.

diatomaceous (dī′ə-tə-mā′shəs) adjective
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diatom - microscopic unicellular marine or freshwater colonial alga having cell walls impregnated with silicadiatom - microscopic unicellular marine or freshwater colonial alga having cell walls impregnated with silica
phytoplankton - photosynthetic or plant constituent of plankton; mainly unicellular algae
alga, algae - primitive chlorophyll-containing mainly aquatic eukaryotic organisms lacking true stems and roots and leaves
Bacillariophyceae, class Bacillariophyceae, class Diatomophyceae, Diatomophyceae - marine and freshwater eukaryotic algae: diatoms
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The little spindle-shaped things in the centre are diatoms and may be disregarded since they are probably vegetable rather than animal.
There are substantial variations in the delivery of dissolved silica from continents to the ocean due to different lithology of drainage areas, continental weathering intensity, climatic variations, and diatom production (Conley, 1997).
Didymo (Didymosphenia geminata) is a freshwater colonial diatom originally found at high latitudes in the northern hemisphere including the British Isles and Europe, where blooms historically occurred, and North America where records before the 1990s are much-less common and blooms were not reported (Spaulding and Elwell, 2007; Blanco and Ector, 2009).
There are Diatom sections consisting mainly of UM sediments and containing an amount of Middle Miocene sediments.
The classification of river health based on the diatom index has been developed and widely used in many countries.
If I can tell you how a single diatom--a type of phytoplankton--can respond to a passing cloud, then I can tell you how diatom populations respond to passing clouds.
It finds wide use in filtering beer, wine and is an ingredient in other products because the diatom fossils have lots of minute holes.
The usual practice of abalone culture in hatcheries involves the use of plastic plates covered with diatom films for postlarval settlement and continuously as a food source for the growing postlarvae (Kawamura et al.
In June 2009, nine tip-up pools from Tribbetts Woods, an oldgrowth remnant forest in Jennings County, Indiana, USA were sampled to determine their diatom composition.
The lower part of the core (400-365 cm) contains abundant benthic brackish/marine diatom flora, notably Planothidium delicatulum and Naviculaperegrina (Fig.
At least half of the heat-trapping carbon captured by the resulting bloom of diatoms, a type of algae, sank below 3,300 ft, leading the scientists to conclude that "iron-fertilized diatom blooms may sequester carbon for timescales of centuries in ocean bottom water and for longer in the sediments.
Community attributes were found to be similar between the two sites, while indicator species varied as determined by Trophic Diatom Index values and the percentage of tolerant taxa to pollutants.