dichotomy

(redirected from dichotomies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

di·chot·o·my

 (dī-kŏt′ə-mē)
n. pl. di·chot·o·mies
1. A division into two contrasting parts or categories: the dichotomy between rural and urban communities; regards the division between nature and nurture as a false dichotomy.
2. Astronomy The phase of the moon, Mercury, or Venus when half of the disk is illuminated.
3. Botany Branching characterized by successive forking into two approximately equal divisions.

[Greek dikhotomiā, from dikhotomos, divided in two : dikho-, dicho- + temnein, to cut; see tem- in Indo-European roots.]

dichotomy

(daɪˈkɒtəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. division into two parts or classifications, esp when they are sharply distinguished or opposed: the dichotomy between eastern and western cultures.
2. (Logic) logic the division of a class into two mutually exclusive subclasses: the dichotomy of married and single people.
3. (Botany) botany a simple method of branching by repeated division into two equal parts
4. (Astronomy) the phase of the moon, Venus, or Mercury when half of the disc is visible
[C17: from Greek dichotomia; see dicho-, -tomy]
diˈchotomous, dichotomic adj
diˈchotomously adv
Usage: Dichotomy should always refer to a division of some kind into two groups. It is sometimes used to refer to a puzzling situation which seems to involve a contradiction, but this use is generally thought to be incorrect

di•chot•o•my

(daɪˈkɒt ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. division into two parts or kinds; subdivision into halves or pairs.
2. division into two exclusive, opposed, or contradictory groups: a dichotomy between thought and action.
3. a mode of branching by constant forking, as in some stems.
4. the phase of the moon or of an inferior planet when half of its disk is visible.
[1600–10; < Greek]

dichotomy

division of material into two parts for the purpose of classification. — dichotomist, n.
See also: Classification
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dichotomy - being twofold; a classification into two opposed parts or subclasses; "the dichotomy between eastern and western culture"
categorisation, categorization, classification - a group of people or things arranged by class or category

dichotomy

noun division, gulf, split, separation, polarity, disjunction a dichotomy between the academic world and the industrial world
Usage: Dichotomy should always refer to a division of some kind into two groups. It is sometimes used to refer to a puzzling situation, which seems to involve a contradiction, but this use is thought by many to be incorrect, and dilemma is a more appropriate alternative.
Translations

dichotomy

[dɪˈkɒtəmɪ] Ndicotomía f

dichotomy

[daɪˈkɒtəmi] ndichotomie f
a dichotomy between → une dichotomie entre

dichotomy

nTrennung f, → Dichotomie f

dichotomy

[dɪˈkɒtəmɪ] n (frm) → dicotomia

di·chot·o·my

, dichotomization
n. dicotomía, dicotomización, división en dos partes; bifurcación.
References in periodicals archive ?
Every nation has one dichotomy or the other, if it is not the north/south, it is versus blocs or religious or even ideological dichotomies. There are several reasons why such dichotomies exist.
When, in the aftermath of the shooting incident in Mandaluyong City, Bato dela Rosa said he would rather have stupid people with good intentions instead of smart people with bad intentions, he was making use of a rhetorical device widely deployed in our political discourse: presenting false dichotomies, or making people pick between two things as if these were the only choices.
Huebert examines the prayer closet to argue that the dichotomies of 'Protestant and Catholic, male and female, body and soul' are dissolved (p.
It turns out that the answer to this question is positive and such characterization was developed in [31] (see also [32]) and applied to the above-mentioned roughness property of tempered dichotomies. However, the approach developed in [31] is far from satisfactory since the construction of appropriate spaces on which the Mather type of operator acts is given in terms of the so-called Lyapunov norms which transform nonuniform behaviour into the uniform.
Specific topics include rethinking Vietnamese women's property rights and the role of ancestor worship in premodern society: beyond the dichotomies, divorce prevalence under the forces of individualism and collectivism in "shortcut" modernity in Vietnam, living in intimacy: a case study of women's community at a Caodaist temple in Hanoi, and Marianism in the transnational public sphere between Vietnamese Catholics in the US and Vietnam.
The first is to interrogate many of the standardly accepted dichotomies in the discourse on human rights--e.g.
Do ILS learning styles correlate with each of the sixteen MBTI personality types and do MBTI dichotomies measure against the ILS?
Individuals and groups constantly simplify their social and personal worlds by creating dichotomies: them/us, rich/poor, educated/ unqualified, among many everyday examples.
AFTER BOUNDARIES, DICHOTOMIES, AND SUCH: SOME CONTEMPORARY BIOETHICAL PERSPECTIVES ON THE HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE.
Lambertus is too committed to a liberal analysis that suggests media unwittingly create uninformed "false dichotomies" of Native versus European and she admonishes them to stop doing this.
For example, movement on the court while the clock is running can be broken down into dichotomies. On offense, cutting without the ball is either to right or left.