dictation

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dic·ta·tion

 (dĭk-tā′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of dictating material to another for transcription.
b. The material so dictated.
2. An authoritative command or order.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dictation

(dɪkˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act of dictating material to be recorded or taken down in writing
2. the material dictated
3. authoritative commands or the act of giving them
dicˈtational adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dic•ta•tion

(dɪkˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or manner of dictating for reproduction in writing.
2. the act or manner of transcribing words uttered by another.
3. words that are dictated or that are reproduced from dictation.
4. the playing or singing of music to be notated by a listener, esp. as a technique of training the ear.
5. music notated from dictation.
6. the act of commanding arbitrarily.
7. something commanded.
[1650–60; < Late Latin]
dic•ta′tion•al, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dictation - an authoritative direction or instruction to do somethingdictation - an authoritative direction or instruction to do something
speech act - the use of language to perform some act
countermand - a contrary command cancelling or reversing a previous command
order - (often plural) a command given by a superior (e.g., a military or law enforcement officer) that must be obeyed; "the British ships dropped anchor and waited for orders from London"
commission, direction, charge - a formal statement of a command or injunction to do something; "the judge's charge to the jury"
commandment - something that is commanded
injunction - a formal command or admonition
behest - an authoritative command or request
open sesame - a magical command; used by Ali Baba
2.dictation - speech intended for reproduction in writing
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
3.dictation - matter that has been dictated and transcribed; a dictated passage; "he signed and mailed his dictation without bothering to read it"
matter - written works (especially in books or magazines); "he always took some reading matter with him on the plane"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إِمْلاءإمْلاء
diktát
diktat
sanelu
diktiranje
tollbamondás
upplestur
口述
받아쓰기
diktát
narek
diktamen
การเขียนตามคำบอก
sự đọc chính tả

dictation

[dɪkˈteɪʃən] N (to secretary, schoolchild etc) → dictado m
to take (a) dictationescribir al dictado
at dictation speeda velocidad de dictado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dictation

[dɪkˈteɪʃən]
n
(= reading aloud) (by teacher)dictée f
to take dictation from sb [secretary] → écrire sous la dictée de qn dictation speed
(= coercion) → contrainte f, pression fdictation speed nvitesse f de dictée
at dictation speed → à une vitesse de dictée
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dictation

n (also Sch) → Diktat nt; to take (down) dictationein Diktat aufnehmen; to read at dictation speedin Diktiertempo lesen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dictation

[dɪkˈteɪʃn] n (to secretary) → dettatura (Scol) → dettato
at dictation speed → a velocità di dettatura
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dictate

(dikˈteit) , ((American) ˈdikteit) verb
1. to say or read out (something) for someone else to write down. He always dictates his letters (to his secretary).
2. to state officially or with authority. He dictated the terms of our offer.
3. to give orders to; to command. I certainly won't be dictated to by you (= I won't do as you say).
dicˈtation noun
something read for another to write down. The secretary is taking dictation.
dicˈtator noun
an all-powerful ruler. As soon as he became dictator, he made all political parties illegal and governed the country as he liked.
dicˈtatorship noun
1. the authority of a dictator. His dictatorship is threatened by the terrorists.
2. a state ruled by a dictator. That country is a dictatorship now.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

dictation

إِمْلاء diktát diktat Diktat υπαγόρευση dictado sanelu dictée diktiranje dettatura 口述 받아쓰기 dictaat diktat dyktando ditado диктант diktamen การเขียนตามคำบอก dikte sự đọc chính tả 听写
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1972, after the brutal and savage response of Pakistani state to the expression of freewill by the majority Bengali people, Sayed lost all hope of getting a sovereign Sindh and realized the futility of his efforts to change the 'oppressive, discriminatory, dictational and colonial character of the state'.
The dispersals of its attentions speak simultaneously of sublime authorial control and wild dictational abandonment ...
"Parts of the manuscript here presented," McFarland observes, recorded by an amanuensis palpably almost swamped by the dictational flow, and dictated off the top of his head by a Coleridge whose opium dosage we can only guess at, ooze murkily through a swamp of near-unintelligibility." A further obstacle to more timely publication was, in the editor's words, Coleridge's "neurotic predilection for plagiarism." One protege described the poet's habit of uttering, "with all the pomp of an original discovery," concepts "plundered wholesale from some German book."