dictionary-maker

dictionary-maker

n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a person who compiles a dictionary
2. (Languages) a person who compiles a dictionary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
I know likewise, that writers of travels, like dictionary-makers, are sunk into oblivion by the weight and bulk of those who come last, and therefore lie uppermost.
The dictionary-maker was a hero among the grubs, as Johnson's entry acknowledged, saluting Grub Street as home, but saluting it in the words of Odysseus, and in untranslated Greek: [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]." ("Hail Ithaca!
It is eventually left to the reader to decide whether Leiris's entries are sufficiently structured to deserve the name of "dictionary entries." By suggesting that readers assume the dictionary-maker's position, Glossaire makes them much more active than they usually are, and freer.
The team has scoured medieval manuscripts and published texts for words which have either been overlooked by earlier dictionary-makers or which have been erroneously defined.
Just to get an idea of the lexicographical sense of humor, I spent a half hour in the library the other day, checking to see what clever examples the dictionary-makers provide us.
Cormac McKeown, of the Collins dictionary editorial team, said: "It's hard to convince people that dictionary-makers mirror rather than create the language, but it's true.
Martine Furno examines dictionary-makers in "De l'erudit au pedagogue: prosopographie des auteurs de dictionnaires latins, XVIe-XVIIIe siecles," suggesting that around the beginning of the seventeenth century, this work passed from learned lexicographers to educators.
The more authoritatively so, in that the profound pronouncement about language is issued by the greatest of dictionary-makers. Not--it has at once to be added--the maker of the greatest dictionary, for he was a lesser great man than Johnson (not quite the same as a less great man than Johnson), being the man who gave himself and us the New, later the Oxford, English Dictionary: the indispensable James A.
To celebrate the 250th anniversary of Dr Johnson's famous dictionary the Samuel Johnson Birthplace Museum and Lichfield Heritage Centre are hosting a joint exhibition - Dr Johnson and the Word Detectives - exploring the work of the dictionary-makers.
They are the ones who taught the dictionary-makers how to spell "bootylicious." They are the ones who were fashionably chic in velour jogging suits back in the '80s, long before Juicy Couture.
Of course, dictionary-makers pride themselves that they have included recent words.
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