dictum

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dic·tum

 (dĭk′təm)
n. pl. dic·ta (-tə) or dic·tums
1. An authoritative, often formal pronouncement: "He cites Augustine's dictum that 'If you understand it, it is not God'" (Joseph Sobran).
2. Law A side remark made in a judicial opinion that is not necessary for the decision in the case and therefore is not to be regarded as establishing the law of the case or setting legal precedent. Also called obiter dictum.

[Latin, from neuter past participle of dīcere, to say; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

dictum

(ˈdɪktəm)
n, pl -tums or -ta (-tə)
1. a formal or authoritative statement or assertion; pronouncement
2. a popular saying or maxim
3. (Law) law See obiter dictum
[C16: from Latin, from dīcere to say]

dic•tum

(ˈdɪk təm)

n., pl. -ta (-tə), -tums.
1. an authoritative pronouncement; judicial assertion.
2. a saying; maxim.
[1660–70; < Latin: a saying, command, word; compare index]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dictum - an authoritative declarationdictum - an authoritative declaration  
declaration - a statement that is emphatic and explicit (spoken or written)
directive - a pronouncement encouraging or banning some activity; "the boss loves to send us directives"
2.dictum - an opinion voiced by a judge on a point of law not directly bearing on the case in question and therefore not binding
judgement, legal opinion, opinion, judgment - the legal document stating the reasons for a judicial decision; "opinions are usually written by a single judge"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

dictum

noun
1. saying, saw, maxim, adage, proverb, precept, axiom, gnome the dictum that it is preferable to be roughly right than precisely wrong
2. decree, order, demand, statement, command, dictate, canon, fiat, edict, pronouncement his dictum that the priority of the government must be the health of the people
Translations

dictum

[ˈdɪktəm] N (dictums, dicta (pl)) [ˈdɪktə]sentencia f, aforismo m (Jur) → dictamen m

dictum

n pl <dicta> → Diktum nt

dictum

[ˈdɪktəm] n (dictums or dicta (pl))
a. (pronouncement) → affermazione f
b. (maxim) → massima
References in classic literature ?
And you say the Swiss are mercenary, as a parrot says 'Poor Poll,' or as the Belgians here say the English are not brave, or as the French accuse them of being perfidious: there is no justice in your dictums.
Amy Eshton, not hearing or not heeding this dictum, joined in with her soft, infantine tone: "Louisa and I used to quiz our governess too; but she was such a good creature, she would bear anything: nothing put her out.
The young man thought of the little sister frisking over the Parthenon and the Mount of Olives and sharing for two years, the years of the school-room, this extraordinary pilgrimage of her parents; he wondered whether Goethe's dictum had been justified in this case.
But if we accept this dictum we need have no more fear of 'mysteries': these become thenceforth merely obstacles.
No service was too humble for him to perform in the aid of the South, no adventure to perilous for him to undertake if consistent with the character of a civilian who was at heart a soldier, and who in good faith and without too much qualification assented to at least a part of the frankly villainous dictum that all is fair in love and war.
It freezes the water to prevent it running to the sea; it drives the sap out of the trees till they are frozen to their mighty hearts; and most ferociously and terribly of all does the Wild harry and crush into submission man--man who is the most restless of life, ever in revolt against the dictum that all movement must in the end come to the cessation of movement.