didachist

didachist

1. a writer of the anonymous 2nd-century Christian manual of morals and church practices called the Didache.
2. an expert on or student of the Didache.
See also: Christianity
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The anonymous author/compiler, known as "the Didachist," drew on existing sources and organized them in four distinct sections: the moral teaching known as the "Two Ways" (chaps.
They share the common view that the Didachist relied on a Jewish document as his basis.
The Two Ways portion of the book concludes with a rather unconvincing argument that Didache 6:2-3 was tacked onto the GTW and represents the legacy of a Torah-observant Jewish-Christian community (the "whole yoke of the Lord" in Didache 6:2 is the Law), preserved unwittingly by the Didachist (238-70).
Fifteen of the seventeen contributions are in English; one in German (Kurt Niederwimmer on the Didachist and his sources); and one in French (Andre Tuilier on the Didache and the synoptic problem).
Second, N.'s introduction clearly details the several complex problems in the textual and manuscript history of the document, the "didachist's" sources (the Jewish-Christian "Two Ways" document, archaic liturgical traditions, a tradition about the reception of itinerant "charismatics," and a brief apocalypse), as well as the final redaction into what ultimately became the document known as the Didache.
This Didachist' is the only redactor with whom we have to do.
What follows, therefore - the direction that the prophets may give thanks as they please - is the rubric for the sacramental meal; in the Didachist's day the prophet's ministry would be performed by the bishop or bishops.
The rest of Niederwimmer's case, that the Didachist takes the early rules for apostles and prophets (and teachers) and applies them to the different conditions of his own day when he writes about bishops and deacons in 15.12, is much more plausible.