die-off


Also found in: Medical.

die-off

(dī′ôf′, -ŏf′)
n.
A sudden collapse of a species or of a population or community of organisms, as from disease or environmental disruption.

die-off

n
(Biology) the process or occurrence of large numbers of deaths in a population of animals, plants, etc

die′-off`

or die′off`,



n.
a sudden decline in a natural population from causes other than human intervention.
[1935–40]
References in periodicals archive ?
While we are trying to learn how to slow or stop their expansion, the recent die-off of thousands of fish for whatever reason has occurred naturally, noted Frank Fiss, Chief of TWRAs Fish Division.
In this week's edition of the Trib+Water newsletter: The Ogallala aquifer is being drained away, a coral reef off the Texas coast is the scene of a mass marine life die-off and an interview with Paul Choules of the Texas Desalination Association.
A suspected die-off of roughly 75 percent of land species didn't accompany the Permian extinction around 252 million years ago, a team of geologists contends.
There is no direct connection between the mass die-off of saiga antelopes and launches of the Russian rocket-carriers Proton at the Baikonur cosmodrome, said acting chairman of the Aerospace Committee of the Ministry of Investment and Development of Kazakhstan Meirbek Moldabekov.
ROCKAWAY BEACH - Thousands of jellyfish- like creatures have been piling up on the beach in what appears to be a massive die-off.
The findings are the latest volley in an ongoing debate over whether an asteroid or volcanism killed off the dinosaurs about 65 million years ago in the mass die-off known as the K-T extinction.
Practical methods are needed to accurately measure the low, but infective, concentrations and die-off rates of the pathogens themselves.
Affected and healthy-cohort mussels were collected to characterize the bacterial flora prior to, during, and after a July 2006 die-off, and during a subsequent die-off in September 2008.
From November 1998 through early April 1999, a bird die-off occurred on the north shore of Lake Apopka, Florida.
Some scientists have theorized that a single, large asteroid may have hit the Yucatan Peninsula in present-day Mexico, sparking the die-off.
Snowfall was much above normal during 3 of 5 years of tick-related moose die-offs in central Alberta, including 50 cm above normal during the major die-off of moose in late winter-spring 1982 (Table 1).