diegesis


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di·e·ge·sis

 (dī′ə-jē′sĭs)
n. pl. di·e·ge·ses (-sēz)
1. The presentation of a narrative without direct dramatic imitation of the events, scenes, or characters described.
2. The world that is depicted in a work of narrative art, especially a film.

[Greek diēgēsis, narration, narrative, from diēgeisthai, to describe : dia-, dia- + hēgeisthai, to lead; see sāg- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diegesis

(ˌdaɪiːˈdʒiːsɪs)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in narrative film or literature) the fictional setting, events, and characters
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

diegesis

- The narrative or plot.
See also related terms for narrative.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
diégèse
diegese
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References in periodicals archive ?
intradiegetic The same as diegetic, meaning "in the diegesis"; it refers to the second narrative level, produced by the extradiegetic narrator's act of narrating, and to every event in the world of this first narrative, including the narrating act of the intradiegetic narrator (provided that there is such); thus, intradiegetic universe means the same as diegetic universe (ND, 228-29).
I don't intend to read what is not there in the diegesis. However, from what we do see, I think it is fair to say that this moment is transgressive, disruptive of the dominant narrative, and thus a corrective to the widely accepted belief that the name Shaft is synonymous with heterosexism in addition to violence and "macho" posturing.
(9) In all cases cited, he is referring principally to the primary diegesis or the extradiegesis.
These silences highlight the articulation of diegesis and mimesis in Matthew's "laconic" story.
area of affect and signification that is not so much in the diegesis as
A basic difference between historical films appears when we take history as an argument: either (a) the narrative uses history as a pretext for its own elaboration, or (ab) on the contrary, when it is not only a setting justifying a narrative, history takes on board a cause that transcends that of the story being told and that of the diegesis.(4) The author thus involves himself in a process of connecting past and present.
Likewise, the diegesis of Il Castello dei destini incrociati dramatizes a process of recovering a receding, cognitive, instrumental rationality.
For instance, we are asked to consider the fact that Socrates' condemnation in The Republic of Homer's use of a dramatized form of narration in which the characters 'speak for themselves' - mimesis, rather than the use of one's own voice in diegesis - comes to us from Plato 'in the very manner that he has Socrates define and criticise as mimetic' (17).
Under the Empire, for example, the progymnasmata of Theon drew heavily from the historians, especially for examples of narrative (diegesis), of discussions of reliability (anaskeue and kataskeue), and of description (ecphrasis) (cf.
Answering the "easy-to-come-by" questions enables readers to arrive at a kind of cliched diegesis. It is only when they continue to ask questions that the illusion of reality may begin to fall away, allowing them to appreciate how a text may contrive a number of competing fictions: the hermeneutics of the story.