diegetic


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di·e·ge·tic

 (dī′ə-jĕt′ĭk)
adj.
Of or relating to artistic elements that are perceived as existing within the world depicted in a narrative work: diegetic sound.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diegetic

(ˌdaɪəˈdʒɛtɪk)
adj
of or relating to diegesis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
diégétique
diegeta
References in periodicals archive ?
What, if anything, might have been left out of the diegetic narration that led to the chess scene?
It is almost as if "what is mourned is the memory of deep memory: what is enacted is a nostalgia for nostalgia" (Jameson 1991, 156), a kind of pre-postmodernist fantasy that likely partially explains the diegetic audience's motivations for spending so much time with Truman.
Diegetic performances within film, such as those within The Blue Angel, pose further complications, as the performer is the object of both diegetic and nondiegetic gazes.
The diegetic, the fictional or story world in which the events and situations that are narrated occur (Prince, 2003), is constantly disrupted by the cats interacting with the narrator.
Language, narrativity, and ethics, therefore, begin to coalesce as we proceed, with the next observation: "In short, Captain MacWhirr behaves as if there was no adequate word to render the truth of what is coming upon them, and thus the typhoon is once more evacuated, at the textual level this time and no longer merely at the diegetic level, from the narrative" (184).
The poems she uses to test this premise disclose a layering of audiences and a complex interplay of detachment and participation, diegetic and extra-diegetic perspectives, reception and performance.
But since he is not merely, or even primarily, a mimetic novelist, O'Brian habitually violates the mimetic principle that others have seen as his central, or even exclusive, accomplishment in order to pursue patently diegetic goals.
As D'Arcens notes, the Queen soundtrack becomes more explicitly diegetic when tournament audiences clap along to a reprise of 'We Will Rock You'.
Well versed in the narratology of Genette and his successors, he sometimes agonizes over the 'diegetic' status of a narrative statement, where a more commonsensical approach might assume that readers will remain happily oblivious to all such logical anomalies provided that they serve some purpose.
When Maria engages, on the diegetic level, in erotically charged banter with the two male revelers (Jason Baughan as Toby and Simon Scardifield as Aguecheek), a homoerotic tension also develops on the actor level--a tension that parallels the homoerotic element of Toby and Aguecheek's companionship (on the diegetic level), which was emphasized in this production by the abundance of physical horseplay between the two.
The initial presentation can be perplexing, for Ascunce Arrieta continually assigns different names to narrative entities as the complexity of the diegetic plane increases.
He is not needlessly jargony, but he does use professional shorthand for brief musical examples and specialized but not rebarbative vocabulary (e.g., using "diegetic" to distinguish those moments when the characters on stage hear or perform music themselves).