dielectric constant


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dielectric constant

n.
The ratio of the permittivity of a material to that of a perfect vacuum. Also called relative permittivity.

dielectric constant

n
(General Physics) another name for relative permittivity
References in periodicals archive ?
The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss factor are two measures that need to be established.
Figure 10 shows the frequency depending on dielectric constant ([epsilon]') and dielectric loss factor ([epsilon]") of P(DEAMSt13%-co- St)L" ligand and metal complexes.
In this article, a ZnO nanowire/PVDF composite with a high dielectric constant was synthesized and piezoelectric behavior was observed while varying the concentration of the ZnO nanowires, the nanowire alignment process, and the poling condition.
Figure 10 shows the frequency dependence of dielectric constant for different alumina concentrations.
Dielectric constant and tangent loss decrease as the frequency of externally applied field increases.
It is well known introducing defects into the crystal lattice of a traditional, normal ferroelectric ceramic can transform it to a relaxor ferroelectric with improved dielectric constant and electromechanical response [29, 30], Therefore, we conclude that the copolymer changed to a typical relaxor ferroelectric after the addition of the terpolymer, which resulted in the degradation of [E.sub.c] and [P.sub.r] under an electric field of 125 MV/m.
Lanthanum oxide nanoparticles have been used in the production of the hybrid materials due to their high dielectric constant while anthracene was used due to its very cheap price and good availability.
Inoue, Hayashi, and Inamura developed such an elastomer with high flexibility and a high dielectric constant based on mixtures of polyrotaxanes.
The dielectric constant of the COF-LZU-1/terpolyimide composite films was measured on a Hioki 3532-50 LCR Hitester in the frequency range of 50 Hz to 5 MHz.
"This is true for the bio, moisture, and water-related impurities that effect the dielectric constant of the fuel.
have been the first to report the exceptional dielectric properties of CCTO [11], and since then, a significant effort has been devoted to understand the polarization mechanisms that justify the colossal dielectric constant ([epsilon]' > [10.sup.5]) observed for poly-[12, 13] and single-crystalline ceramics [14].
However, pure polymer material suffers from the defect of low dielectric constant [21, 22].