diencephalon

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di·en·ceph·a·lon

 (dī′ĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏn′, -lən)
n.
The posterior part of the forebrain that connects the midbrain with the cerebral hemispheres, encloses the third ventricle, and contains the thalamus and hypothalamus. Also called betweenbrain, interbrain.


di·en·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

diencephalon

(ˌdaɪɛnˈsɛfəˌlɒn)
n, pl -la (-lə)
(Anatomy) the part of the brain that includes the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, and associated areas
diencephalic adj

di•en•ceph•a•lon

(ˌdaɪ ɛnˈsɛf əˌlɒn)

n., pl. -lons, -la (-lə).
the posterior section of the forebrain including the thalami and hypothalamus.
[1880–85; di-3 + encephalon]
di`en•ce•phal′ic (-səˈfæl ɪk) adj.

diencephalon

The “between brain” area of the forebrain between the midbrain and cerebral hemispheres. It includes the thalamus and the hypothalamus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diencephalon - the posterior division of the forebraindiencephalon - the posterior division of the forebrain; connects the cerebral hemispheres with the mesencephalon
corpus mamillare, mamillary body, mammillary body - one of two small round structures on the undersurface of the brain that form the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix
infundibulum - any of various funnel-shaped parts of the body (but especially the hypophyseal stalk)
pineal eye, third eye - a sensory structure capable of light reception located on the dorsal side of the diencephalon in various reptiles
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
nervus opticus, optic nerve, optic tract, second cranial nerve - the cranial nerve that serves the retina
hypophysis, pituitary, pituitary body, pituitary gland - the master gland of the endocrine system; located at the base of the brain
forebrain, prosencephalon - the anterior portion of the brain; the part of the brain that develops from the anterior part of the neural tube
basal ganglion - any of several masses of subcortical grey matter at the base of each cerebral hemisphere that seem to be involved in the regulation of voluntary movement
thalamus - large egg-shaped structures of grey matter that form the dorsal subdivision of the diencephalon
hypothalamus - a basal part of the diencephalon governing autonomic nervous system
Translations

di·en·ceph·a·lon

n. diencéfalo, parte del cerebro.
References in periodicals archive ?
In human, the embryonic patterning affects all brain regions from then forebrain through the spinal column, such that by the end of the embryonic period primitive patterning of sensorimotor regions within the neocortex is established (Bishop et al., 2000), major compartments within diencephalic and midbrain regions have differentiated (Kiecker & Lumsden, 2004; Nakamura et al., 2005), and the segmental organization of the hindbrain and spinal column have been specified (Gavalas et al., 2003).
Neuroimaging studies indicate the presence of damage in diencephalic subcortical structures (thalamus, cerebellum, mammillary bodies) and cortical structures (frontal, parietal and cingulate).
This mutation has been found in approximately 10% of PA cases and frequently in PAs inextra-cerebellar locations, such as diencephalic tumors.
The clinical spectrum of SIH is quite variable and includes headache, neck stiffness, cranial nerve dysfunction, radicular arm pain and symptoms of diencephalic or hindbrain herniation (1,2).
Spontaneous intracranial hypotension resulting in stupor caused by diencephalic compression.
Changes in the exercise activation of diencephalic and brainstem cardiorespiratory areas after training.
For example, intense somatic staining was evident in cells directly adjacent to the telencephalic ventricles (TelV; Figure 1B), the rhombocephalic ventricles (RV; Figures 1A, 1C), the tectal ventricle (TeV; Figure 1D), and the hypothalamic diencephalic ventricle (DiV; Figure 1E).
Lipodystrophy and gigantism with associated endocrine manifestations: a new diencephalic syndrome?
In diencephalic regions there were few vessels with few lymphocytes in the Virchow-Robin spaces and few small foci of intrameningeal lymphocytes present.
[6] Typical patterns of brain involvement in NMOSD, although not pathognomonic, include lesions of the dorsal medulla/area postrema, periependymal regions in the brainstem, diencephalic structures, or cerebral hemispheres or long lesions spanning much of the corpus callosum or corticospinal tracts, corresponding to regions of high AQP4 expression.
Systemic oxytocin treatment modulates alpha 2-adrenoceptors in telencephalic and diencephalic regions of the rat.
Narcolepsy and low CSF orexin (hypocretin) concentration after a diencephalic stroke.