diencephalon


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di·en·ceph·a·lon

 (dī′ĕn-sĕf′ə-lŏn′, -lən)
n.
The posterior part of the forebrain that connects the midbrain with the cerebral hemispheres, encloses the third ventricle, and contains the thalamus and hypothalamus. Also called betweenbrain, interbrain.


di·en·ce·phal′ic (-sə-făl′ĭk) adj.

diencephalon

(ˌdaɪɛnˈsɛfəˌlɒn)
n, pl -la (-lə)
(Anatomy) the part of the brain that includes the basal ganglia, thalamus, hypothalamus, and associated areas
diencephalic adj

di•en•ceph•a•lon

(ˌdaɪ ɛnˈsɛf əˌlɒn)

n., pl. -lons, -la (-lə).
the posterior section of the forebrain including the thalami and hypothalamus.
[1880–85; di-3 + encephalon]
di`en•ce•phal′ic (-səˈfæl ɪk) adj.

diencephalon

The “between brain” area of the forebrain between the midbrain and cerebral hemispheres. It includes the thalamus and the hypothalamus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diencephalon - the posterior division of the forebraindiencephalon - the posterior division of the forebrain; connects the cerebral hemispheres with the mesencephalon
corpus mamillare, mamillary body, mammillary body - one of two small round structures on the undersurface of the brain that form the terminals of the anterior arches of the fornix
infundibulum - any of various funnel-shaped parts of the body (but especially the hypophyseal stalk)
pineal eye, third eye - a sensory structure capable of light reception located on the dorsal side of the diencephalon in various reptiles
neural structure - a structure that is part of the nervous system
nervus opticus, optic nerve, optic tract, second cranial nerve - the cranial nerve that serves the retina
hypophysis, pituitary, pituitary body, pituitary gland - the master gland of the endocrine system; located at the base of the brain
forebrain, prosencephalon - the anterior portion of the brain; the part of the brain that develops from the anterior part of the neural tube
basal ganglion - any of several masses of subcortical grey matter at the base of each cerebral hemisphere that seem to be involved in the regulation of voluntary movement
thalamus - large egg-shaped structures of grey matter that form the dorsal subdivision of the diencephalon
hypothalamus - a basal part of the diencephalon governing autonomic nervous system
Translations

di·en·ceph·a·lon

n. diencéfalo, parte del cerebro.
References in periodicals archive ?
The virus was almost always detected in the spinal cord (93%) and the neopallium (87%); often in the midbrain (83%) and pons (67%); and about half the time in the diencephalon, cerebellum, and paleopallium.
The usual and characteristic MRI finding is a large T2 hyperintense lesion in the brainstem or basal ganglia region extending to diencephalon resembling a waterfall (Figure 1), with a small central enhancement.
Deteriorating level of consciousness as the blood supply of the diencephalon and midbrain perforating vessels is compromised
It regulates gene expression in the thyroid, lungs, and diencephalon during embryogenesis.
Other regions-such as the brainstem, diencephalon, or insular cortex-could sense the body's most primal inner signals of danger when basic survival is threatened.
Volumetric development of the fetal telencephalon, cerebral cortex, diencephalon, and rhombencephalon including the cerebellum in man.
Intact brains were removed from the skull, and the diencephalon was dissected and successively homogenized in 1 ml of 0.
The brain, a relatively small organ in the human body responsible for the regulation of all human body subsystems, has four major regions--the cerebrum, diencephalon, the brain stem, and the cerebellum (Floyd, Mikkelson, & Hesse, 2008).
The diencephalon of the zebrafish brain corresponds lo the substantia nigra of the human brain.
The diencephalon, another region that includes several structures such as the thalamus and hypothalamus, also had reduced volumes (Mattson et al.
For an umbrella term, I am satisfied with the general dictionary definition of cerebral, which describes it as pertaining to the brain without dealing with the finer distinctions between the prosencephalon, mesencephalon, and diencephalon.
Plato's account strikingly evokes certain work in evolutionary neuropsychology according to which, when the intellect and emotions are engaged--and not severally or jointly quieted--mental life is typified by near constant conflict between the intellectual cortex and the appetitive/emotional diencephalon.