fiber

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Related to dietary fiber: Soluble fiber

fi·ber

 (fī′bər)
n.
1. A slender, elongated, threadlike object or structure.
2. Botany One of the elongated, thick-walled cells that give strength and support to plant tissue.
3. Anatomy
a. Any of the filaments constituting the extracellular matrix of connective tissue.
b. Any of various elongated cells or threadlike structures, especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fiber.
4.
a. A natural or synthetic filament, as of cotton or nylon, capable of being spun into yarn.
b. Material made of such filaments.
5.
a. An essential element of a person's character: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature" (Oscar Wilde).
b. Strength of character; fortitude: lacking in moral fiber.
6. Coarse, indigestible plant matter, consisting primarily of polysaccharides such as cellulose, that when eaten stimulates intestinal peristalsis. Also called bulk, roughage.

[French fibre, from Old French, from Latin fibra.]

fi′bered adj.

fiber

(ˈfaɪbə)
n
(Botany) the usual US spelling of fibre

fi•ber

(ˈfaɪ bər)

n.
1. a fine threadlike piece, as of cotton, jute, or asbestos.
2. a slender filament: a fiber of platinum.
3. filaments collectively.
4. material composed of filaments: a plastic fiber.
5. something resembling a filament.
6. an essential character or strength: moral fiber.
7.
a. filamentous matter from the bast tissue or other parts of plants, used for industrial purposes.
8. any of the filaments or elongated cells or structures that are combined in a bundle of tissue: nerve fiber.
9. Also called bulk , roughage. the structural parts of plants that are wholly or partly indigestible, acting to increase intestinal bulk and peristalsis.
Also, esp. Brit., fibre.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Middle French fibre) < Latin fibra filament]
fi′ber•less, adj.

fi·ber

(fī′bər)
1. The parts of grains, fruits, and vegetables that contain cellulose and are not digested by the body. Fiber helps the intestines function properly by stimulating the muscles of the intestinal walls.
2. One of the elongated, thick-walled cells that give strength and support to plant tissue.
3.
a. A single skeletal muscle cell; a muscle fiber.
b. The axon of a nerve cell.

fibrous adjective
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiber - a slender and greatly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarnfiber - a slender and greatly elongated substance capable of being spun into yarn
byssus, beard - tuft of strong filaments by which e.g. a mussel makes itself fast to a fixed surface
bristle - a stiff fiber (coarse hair or filament); natural or synthetic
glass fiber, glass fibre, optical fiber, optical fibre - a very thin fiber made of glass that functions as a waveguide for light; used in bundles to transmit images
nerve fiber, nerve fibre - a threadlike extension of a nerve cell
spindle - (biology) tiny fibers that are seen in cell division; the fibers radiate from two poles and meet at the equator in the middle; "chromosomes are distributed by spindles in mitosis and meiosis"
loofa, loofah, loufah sponge, luffa - the dried fibrous part of the fruit of a plant of the genus Luffa; used as a washing sponge or strainer
cantala, Cebu maguey, manila maguey - hard fiber used in making coarse twine; from Philippine agave plants
bassine - coarse leaf fiber from palmyra palms used in making brushes and brooms
coir - stiff coarse fiber from the outer husk of a coconut
raffia - fiber of a raffia palm used as light cordage and in making hats and baskets
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
cellulose - a polysaccharide that is the chief constituent of all plant tissues and fibers
string - a tough piece of fiber in vegetables, meat, or other food (especially the tough fibers connecting the two halves of a bean pod)
fibril, filament, strand - a very slender natural or synthetic fiber
lint - fine ravellings of cotton or linen fibers
man-made fiber, synthetic fiber - fiber created from natural materials or by chemical processes
natural fiber, natural fibre - fiber derived from plants or animals
oakum - loose hemp or jute fiber obtained by unravelling old ropes; when impregnated with tar it was used to caulk seams and pack joints in wooden ships
raveling, ravelling - a bit of fiber that has become separated from woven fabric
2.fiber - coarse, indigestible plant food low in nutrientsfiber - coarse, indigestible plant food low in nutrients; its bulk stimulates intestinal peristalsis
food product, foodstuff - a substance that can be used or prepared for use as food
bran - food prepared from the husks of cereal grains
3.fiber - any of several elongated, threadlike cells (especially a muscle fiber or a nerve fiber)
cell - (biology) the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms; they may exist as independent units of life (as in monads) or may form colonies or tissues as in higher plants and animals
muscle cell, muscle fiber, muscle fibre - an elongated contractile cell that forms the muscles of the body
nerve fiber, nerve fibre - a threadlike extension of a nerve cell
4.fiber - the inherent complex of attributes that determines a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions; "education has for its object the formation of character"- Herbert Spencer
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
personality - the complex of all the attributes--behavioral, temperamental, emotional and mental--that characterize a unique individual; "their different reactions reflected their very different personalities"; "it is his nature to help others"
spirit - a fundamental emotional and activating principle determining one's character
thoughtfulness - the trait of thinking carefully before acting
responsibleness, responsibility - a form of trustworthiness; the trait of being answerable to someone for something or being responsible for one's conduct; "he holds a position of great responsibility"
integrity - moral soundness; "he expects to find in us the common honesty and integrity of men of business"; "they admired his scrupulous professional integrity"
5.fiber - a leatherlike material made by compressing layers of paper or cloth
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"

fiber

noun
1. A very fine continuous strand:
2. A distinctive, complex underlying pattern or structure:
3. Moral or ethical strength:
Translations
vlákno
fiber
kuitu
vlakno
繊維
섬유
vlakno
fiber
เส้นใย
sợi

fibre

(American) fiber (ˈfaibə) noun
1. a fine thread or something like a thread. a nerve fibre.
2. a material made up of fibres. coconut fibre.
3. character. A girl of strong moral fibre.
ˈfibrous adjective
ˈfibreglass noun, adjective
1. (of) very fine threadlike pieces of glass, used for insulation, in materials etc. fibreglass curtains.
2. (of) a plastic material reinforced with such glass, used for many purposes eg building boats.

fiber

لِيْف vlákno fiber Faser ίνα fibra kuitu fibre vlakno fibra 繊維 섬유 vezel fiber włókno fibra волокно fiber เส้นใย lif sợi 纤维

fi·ber

n. fibra, filamento en forma de hilo.

fiber

n fibra; dietary — fibra dietética or en la dieta; insoluble — fibra insoluble; muscle — fibra muscular; nerve — fibra nerviosa; soluble — fibra soluble
References in periodicals archive ?
There are two main classifications of dietary fiber: soluble fiber which dissolves in water; insoluble fiber which does not dissolve in water.
The effect is related to the physicochemical properties of dietary fiber, water-holding, oil-binding, and cation-exchange capacities.
Dietary Fibers Market report categorizes the global market by Product (Soluble Fiber, Insoluble Fiber), Source (Fruits, Vegetables, Cereals, Grains), and Application (Functional Food and Beverages, Animal Feed, Pet Food, Pharmaceuticals) - Global Industry Insights, Trends, Outlook, and Opportunity Analysis, 2017-2025
Moreover, there also appeared to be a dose-response relationship, suggesting that a higher intake of dietary fiber above 25g to 29g per day could bring even greater benefits to protect against cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, and colorectal and breast cancer.
When in 2016 FDA unveiled a new definition for dietary fiber as part of updating the final rule for the Nutrition Facts label, the agency specified this term referred to "naturally occurring fibers like those found in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and seven isolated (i.e., extracted from plant sources) or synthetic non-digestible carbohydrates (NDCs), each having a physiological health benefit."
* Do you know that numerous studies have shown that dietary fiber protects against heart attacks and strokes.
Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Health Implications of Dietary Fiber. J Acad Nutr Diet.
We are taking a flexible approach to dietary fiber, allowing for the possibility of additional fibers to be added to the list of those meeting our dietary fiber definition if the scientific evidence shows they are physiologically beneficial.
As part of those efforts, today the FDA issued decisions on citizen petitions regarding additional dietary fibers. We also issued a guidance that will allow food manufacturers to count these fibers when calculating the total amount of fiber per serving to declare on the Nutrition Facts label.
The researchers undertook a thorough review of dietary fiber levels in a nationally representative sample of soft-wheat whole-grain flours.
According to Georgia State University researchers, consumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon.
Dietary fiber is defined as "the edible parts of plants or analogous carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the human small intestine with complete or partial fermentation in the large intestine." It includes mainly non-starch polysaccharides, oligosaccharides, resistant starch, and lignins.