dignitary


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dig·ni·tar·y

 (dĭg′nĭ-tĕr′ē)
n. pl. dig·ni·tar·ies
A person of high rank or position.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dignitary

(ˈdɪɡnɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
n, pl -taries
a person of high official position or rank, esp in government or the church
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dig•ni•tar•y

(ˈdɪg nɪˌtɛr i)

n., pl. -tar•ies.
a person who holds a high rank or office, as in a government or church.
[1665–75; dignit (y) + -ary]
dig`ni•tar′i•al (-ˈtɛər i əl) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dignitary - an important or influential (and often overbearing) persondignitary - an important or influential (and often overbearing) person
important person, influential person, personage - a person whose actions and opinions strongly influence the course of events
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dignitary

noun public figure, worthy, notable, high-up (informal), bigwig (informal), celeb (informal), personage, pillar of society, pillar of the church, notability, pillar of the state, V.I.P. He was a visiting dignitary of great importance.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dignitary

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
وَجيه، صاحِب رُتْبَه أو مَقام
hodnostář
dignitarfornem person
maîur í virîingarstöîu
aukštas pareigūnas
augsta amatpersona
hodnostár
önde gelen kişiyüksek mevkili kimse

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtərɪ] Ndignatario/a m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtəri] ndignitaire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dignitary

nWürdenträger(in) m(f); the local dignitariesdie Honoratioren am Ort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dignitary

[ˈdɪgnɪtrɪ] ndignitario
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dignitary

(ˈdignitəri) plural ˈdignitaries noun
a person who has a high rank or office.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Besides Princess Bielokonski, only one other lady was expected, the wife of a high dignitary. Evgenie Pavlovitch, who was to escort the princess, was the only young man.
He saw, for instance, that one important dignitary, old enough to be his grandfather, broke off his own conversation in order to listen to HIM--a young and inexperienced man; and not only listened, but seemed to attach value to his opinion, and was kind and amiable, and yet they were strangers and had never seen each other before.
There were also present a very distinguished dignitary and a Swiss who had formerly been tutor at the Kuragins'.
The Grand Master proposed that the last duty should be performed, and the distinguished dignitary who bore the title of "Collector of Alms" went round to all the brothers.
Came then, from the back of the room a procession headed by the high dignitary whose office it was to make these two man and wife, and directly behind him a richly-clad youth bearing a silken pillow on which lay the golden handcuffs connected by a short length of chain-of-gold with which the ceremony would be concluded when the dignitary clasped a handcuff about the wrist of each symbolizing their indissoluble union in the holy bonds of wedlock.
Death is a dignitary who when he comes announced is to be received with formal manifestations of respect, even by those most familiar with him.
I said that if that potentate must go over in our ship, why, I supposed he must --but that to my thinking, when the United States considered it necessary to send a dignitary of that tonnage across the ocean, it would be in better taste, and safer, to take him apart and cart him over in sections in several ships.
The practice of forming a line and shaking the President's hand had no other origin, and when that great dignitary bestows his healing salutation on
In defiance of conventual rules, and the edicts of popes and councils, the sleeves of this dignitary were lined and turned up with rich furs, his mantle secured at the throat with a golden clasp, and the whole dress proper to his order as much refined upon and ornamented, as that of a quaker beauty of the present day, who, while she retains the garb and costume of her sect continues to give to its simplicity, by the choice of materials and the mode of disposing them, a certain air of coquettish attraction, savouring but too much of the vanities of the world.
Now and then a camel or an elephant would pass bearing some officer or dignitary to safety.
This dignitary, conferring in secrecy with John Rokesmith on the subject of punch and wines, bent his head as though stooping to the Papistical practice of receiving auricular confession.
There were many uncomplimentary references, on the walls, to a certain unpopular dignitary. One sufferer had got three days for not saluting him.