digress


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di·gress

(dī-grĕs′, dĭ-)
intr.v. di·gressed, di·gress·ing, di·gress·es
To stray temporarily from the topic at hand, as in delivering a speech or engaging in a discussion. See Synonyms at swerve.

[Latin dīgredī, dīgress- : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + gradī, to go; see ghredh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

digress

(daɪˈɡrɛs)
vb (intr)
1. to depart from the main subject in speech or writing
2. to wander from one's path or main direction
[C16: from Latin dīgressus turned aside, from dīgredī, from dis- apart + gradī to go]
diˈgresser n

di•gress

(dɪˈgrɛs, daɪ-)

v.i.
1. to wander away from the main topic or argument in speaking or writing.
2. Archaic. to turn aside.
[1520–30; < Latin dīgressus, past participle of dīgredī to go off, depart, digress =dī- di-2 + -gredī, comb. form of gradī to go; compare grade]
syn: See deviate.

digress


Past participle: digressed
Gerund: digressing

Imperative
digress
digress
Present
I digress
you digress
he/she/it digresses
we digress
you digress
they digress
Preterite
I digressed
you digressed
he/she/it digressed
we digressed
you digressed
they digressed
Present Continuous
I am digressing
you are digressing
he/she/it is digressing
we are digressing
you are digressing
they are digressing
Present Perfect
I have digressed
you have digressed
he/she/it has digressed
we have digressed
you have digressed
they have digressed
Past Continuous
I was digressing
you were digressing
he/she/it was digressing
we were digressing
you were digressing
they were digressing
Past Perfect
I had digressed
you had digressed
he/she/it had digressed
we had digressed
you had digressed
they had digressed
Future
I will digress
you will digress
he/she/it will digress
we will digress
you will digress
they will digress
Future Perfect
I will have digressed
you will have digressed
he/she/it will have digressed
we will have digressed
you will have digressed
they will have digressed
Future Continuous
I will be digressing
you will be digressing
he/she/it will be digressing
we will be digressing
you will be digressing
they will be digressing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been digressing
you have been digressing
he/she/it has been digressing
we have been digressing
you have been digressing
they have been digressing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
he/she/it will have been digressing
we will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
they will have been digressing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been digressing
you had been digressing
he/she/it had been digressing
we had been digressing
you had been digressing
they had been digressing
Conditional
I would digress
you would digress
he/she/it would digress
we would digress
you would digress
they would digress
Past Conditional
I would have digressed
you would have digressed
he/she/it would have digressed
we would have digressed
you would have digressed
they would have digressed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.digress - lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking; "She always digresses when telling a story"; "her mind wanders"; "Don't digress when you give a lecture"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
2.digress - wander from a direct or straight course
deviate, divert - turn aside; turn away from

digress

verb wander, drift, stray, depart, ramble, meander, diverge, deviate, turn aside, be diffuse, expatiate, go off at a tangent, get off the point or subject She digressed from the matter under discussion.

digress

verb
1. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
2. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
Translations
odbíhatodbočit
bevæge sig væk fra emnet
gera útúrdúr
novirzīties
konudan ayrılmak

digress

[daɪˈgres] VIhacer una digresión (pej) → divagar
to digress from the subjectapartarse del tema
but I digress (often hum) → pero me estoy apartando del tema

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi (= get off the subject) → faire une digression
to digress from sth [+ topic, subject] → s'écarter de qch, s'éloigner de qch

digress

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi to digress (from)divagare (da), fare digressioni (da)

digress

(daiˈgres) verb
to wander from the point, or from the main subject in speaking or writing.
diˈgression (-ʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
Reader, I think proper, before we proceed any farther together, to acquaint thee that I intend to digress, through this whole history, as often as I see occasion, of which I am myself a better judge than any pitiful critic whatever; and here I must desire all those critics to mind their own business, and not to intermeddle with affairs or works which no ways concern them; for till they produce the authority by which they are constituted judges, I shall not plead to their jurisdiction.
By-and-by, when you've got a name, you can afford to digress, and have philosophical and metaphysical people in your novels," said Amy, who took a strictly practical view of the subject.
"Now let me digress. I live, and have for many years lived, in Derbyshire, a county more celebrated for its caves than any other county in England.
And here I will digress a moment to make a single remark on a subject of which popular feeling, in America, under the influence of popular habits, is apt to take an exparte view.
And here, lest I may be misunderstood, permit me to digress for one moment merely to observe that the exceedingly brief and simple Latin phrase which I have employed, is invariably mistranslated and misconceived.
I may digress by adding, that if the smaller workers had been the most useful to the community, and those males and females had been continually selected, which produced more and more of the smaller workers, until all the workers had come to be in this condition; we should then have had a species of ant with neuters very nearly in the same condition with those of Myrmica.
True, I said; and now that this division of our task is concluded, let us find the point at which we digressed, that we may return into the old path.
When he had enumerated the many different occasions on which the Hurons had exhibited their courage and prowess, in the punishment of insults, he digressed in a high encomium on the virtue of wisdom.
"God sends wrinkles, but what is our face?" she digressed in a tone of great humility.
Inchbare digressed at once to the pressing question of changing the young lady's clothes, and gave Anne the opportunity of looking round her, unobserved.
To return to what I have digressed from, let me add that perhaps they think I report them to you, deliver little messages, and the like.
Schools that will digress from the schedule should notify their respective regional offices in advance, she said.