digress

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Related to digressions: discretions

di·gress

(dī-grĕs′, dĭ-)
intr.v. di·gressed, di·gress·ing, di·gress·es
To stray temporarily from the topic at hand, as in delivering a speech or engaging in a discussion. See Synonyms at swerve.

[Latin dīgredī, dīgress- : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + gradī, to go; see ghredh- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

digress

(daɪˈɡrɛs)
vb (intr)
1. to depart from the main subject in speech or writing
2. to wander from one's path or main direction
[C16: from Latin dīgressus turned aside, from dīgredī, from dis- apart + gradī to go]
diˈgresser n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•gress

(dɪˈgrɛs, daɪ-)

v.i.
1. to wander away from the main topic or argument in speaking or writing.
2. Archaic. to turn aside.
[1520–30; < Latin dīgressus, past participle of dīgredī to go off, depart, digress =dī- di-2 + -gredī, comb. form of gradī to go; compare grade]
syn: See deviate.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

digress


Past participle: digressed
Gerund: digressing

Imperative
digress
digress
Present
I digress
you digress
he/she/it digresses
we digress
you digress
they digress
Preterite
I digressed
you digressed
he/she/it digressed
we digressed
you digressed
they digressed
Present Continuous
I am digressing
you are digressing
he/she/it is digressing
we are digressing
you are digressing
they are digressing
Present Perfect
I have digressed
you have digressed
he/she/it has digressed
we have digressed
you have digressed
they have digressed
Past Continuous
I was digressing
you were digressing
he/she/it was digressing
we were digressing
you were digressing
they were digressing
Past Perfect
I had digressed
you had digressed
he/she/it had digressed
we had digressed
you had digressed
they had digressed
Future
I will digress
you will digress
he/she/it will digress
we will digress
you will digress
they will digress
Future Perfect
I will have digressed
you will have digressed
he/she/it will have digressed
we will have digressed
you will have digressed
they will have digressed
Future Continuous
I will be digressing
you will be digressing
he/she/it will be digressing
we will be digressing
you will be digressing
they will be digressing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been digressing
you have been digressing
he/she/it has been digressing
we have been digressing
you have been digressing
they have been digressing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
he/she/it will have been digressing
we will have been digressing
you will have been digressing
they will have been digressing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been digressing
you had been digressing
he/she/it had been digressing
we had been digressing
you had been digressing
they had been digressing
Conditional
I would digress
you would digress
he/she/it would digress
we would digress
you would digress
they would digress
Past Conditional
I would have digressed
you would have digressed
he/she/it would have digressed
we would have digressed
you would have digressed
they would have digressed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.digress - lose clarity or turn aside especially from the main subject of attention or course of argument in writing, thinking, or speaking; "She always digresses when telling a story"; "her mind wanders"; "Don't digress when you give a lecture"
tell - let something be known; "Tell them that you will be late"
2.digress - wander from a direct or straight course
deviate, divert - turn aside; turn away from
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

digress

verb wander, drift, stray, depart, ramble, meander, diverge, deviate, turn aside, be diffuse, expatiate, go off at a tangent, get off the point or subject She digressed from the matter under discussion.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

digress

verb
1. To turn away from a prescribed course of action or conduct:
Archaic: err.
2. To turn aside, especially from the main subject in writing or speaking:
Idiom: go off at a tangent.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
odbíhatodbočit
bevæge sig væk fra emnet
gera útúrdúr
novirzīties
konudan ayrılmak

digress

[daɪˈgres] VIhacer una digresión (pej) → divagar
to digress from the subjectapartarse del tema
but I digress (often hum) → pero me estoy apartando del tema
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi (= get off the subject) → faire une digression
to digress from sth [+ topic, subject] → s'écarter de qch, s'éloigner de qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

digress

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

digress

[daɪˈgrɛs] vi to digress (from)divagare (da), fare digressioni (da)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

digress

(daiˈgres) verb
to wander from the point, or from the main subject in speaking or writing.
diˈgression (-ʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The great interest with which the important events lately occurring at the Sandwich, Marquesas, and Society Islands, have been regarded in America and England, and indeed throughout the world, will, he trusts, justify a few otherwise unwarrantable digressions.
But a truce to these painful digressions: let me return to our houses.
Good taste will only pardon such digressions as bring him towards his end, and show it from a more striking point of view.
Peter), Martin (the Lutherans and the Church of England, named from Martin Luther), and Jack (the Dissenters, who followed John Calvin); but a great part of the book is made up of irrelevant introductions and digressions in which Swift ridicules various absurdities, literary and otherwise, among them the very practice of digressions.
But, to return from this digression, care ought to be taken that the bodies of the children may be such as will answer the expectations of the legislator; this also will be affected by the same means.
To return from this digression. When I had crept within four yards of the throne, I raised myself gently upon my knees, and then striking my forehead seven times against the ground, I pronounced the following words, as they had been taught me the night before, INCKPLING GLOFFTHROBB SQUUT SERUMMBLHIOP MLASHNALT ZWIN TNODBALKUFFH SLHIOPHAD GURDLUBH ASHT.
I suppose it was a very pretty example of the triumph of spirit over matter, and so my digression has at least the advantage of a moral.
Forgive, I pray you, this inconsequent digression by what was once a woman.
The gallant behaviour of Jones, and the more dreadful consequence of that behaviour to the young lady; with a short digression in favour of the female sex.
After this long digression we have now arrived once more at the point where Pudd'nhead Wilson, while waiting for the arrival of the twins on that same Friday evening, sat puzzling over the strange apparition of that morning--a girl in young Tom Driscoll's bedroom; fretting, and guessing, and puzzling over it, and wondering who the shameless creature might be.
To return from this digression. As the travellers were now in a country abounding with buffalo, they remained for several days encamped upon the banks of Big River, to obtain a supply of provisions, and to give the invalids time to recruit.
And one thing more, before I end this digression. Have you ever dreamed that you dreamed?