digressive

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Related to digressiveness: aggressiveness

di·gres·sive

 (dī-grĕs′ĭv, dĭ-)
adj.
Characterized by digressions; rambling.

di·gres′sive·ly adv.
di·gres′sive·ness n.

digressive

(daɪˈɡrɛsɪv)
adj
characterized by digression or tending to digress
diˈgressively adv
diˈgressiveness n

di•gres•sive

(dɪˈgrɛs ɪv, daɪ-)

adj.
tending to digress.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
di•gres′sive•ly, adv.
di•gres′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.digressive - of superficial relevance if any; "a digressive allusion to the day of the week"; "a tangential remark"
irrelevant - having no bearing on or connection with the subject at issue; "an irrelevant comment"; "irrelevant allegations"
2.digressive - (of e.g. speech and writing) tending to depart from the main point or cover a wide range of subjects; "amusingly digressive with satirical thrusts at women's fashions among other things"; "a rambling discursive book"; "his excursive remarks"; "a rambling speech about this and that"
indirect - extended senses; not direct in manner or language or behavior or action; "making indirect but legitimate inquiries"; "an indirect insult"; "doubtless they had some indirect purpose in mind"; "though his methods are indirect they are not dishonest"; "known as a shady indirect fellow"

digressive

adjective
Marked by or given to digression:
Translations
csapongóelkalandozó

digressive

[daɪˈgresɪv] ADJque se aparta del tema principal

digressive

References in periodicals archive ?
I would have objected to its digressiveness, to its assumption that readers were sufficiently well educated to understand its references and to read its French passages without translation, and to its resolute determination to proceed at its own pace and in its own direction.
He had even implicitly drawn a resemblance between himself and Plutarch in their common practices of borrowing and digressiveness in "De la vanite" (III.
Linguistic effusiveness, however, can achieve varied purposes; in addition to the aims described by Frederick, digressiveness can be utilized as a form of control or occupation.
The novel is infamous for its digressiveness, for its protagonist's inability to stick to a story-line without lapsing into seemingly random asides on various subjects, for its absence of a central, cohesive plot, and for its utter disregard for chronology.
And because reading has no linear impetus, no indicated horizon (vanishing point), so a time which is directional, homogeneous, made up of (notionally) isochronous intervals, is replaced by a time whose very continuity is composed of heterogeneous durations, elasticity, and digressiveness.
From this point of view, philosophy can be seen as being in a perpetual state of digression or digressiveness.
This category can be subdivided into control, intrusiveness and digressiveness.
This is partly because it was propelled by feminism and the breakdown of the global colonial system and partly because Leavis, Hoggart, Williams, and Trilling, Derrida, and the other poststructuralists were masters at the cultivation of an experience--the experience of "theory" in all its wit, digressiveness, and difficulty--that embodies the very alterite they were advocating intellectually and politically.
Digression as narrative mode is a major force here, and this tendency to digressiveness is, I would argue, an important factor in the production of a specifically socialized narrative.
As to the formal defects, Flight lacks the clarity and grace of the best of Berman's earlier writing, and suffers on the whole from disorganization, digressiveness, and an irritating tendency to name-dropping.
West reads Browne's characteristic digressiveness in Pseudodoxia as an instrument for bringing different voices into a shared discursive arena, with contradiction and inconsistency acting as touchstones for further discussion.
Of his dialogue with Pigott, he values its digressiveness (62; cf.