dike


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dike 1

also dyke  (dīk)
n.
1.
a. An embankment of earth and rock built to prevent floods.
b. Chiefly British A low wall, often of sod, dividing or enclosing lands.
2. A barrier blocking a passage, especially for protection.
3. A raised causeway.
4. A ditch; a channel.
5. Geology A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjacent rock.
tr.v. diked, dik·ing, dikes also dyked or dyk·ing or dykes
1. To protect, enclose, or provide with a dike.
2. To drain with dikes or ditches.

[Middle English, from Old English dīc, trench; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots, and from Old Norse dīki, ditch.]

dik′er n.

dike 2

 (dīk)
n. Offensive Slang
Variant of dyke2.

dike

(daɪk)
n, vb
1. (Civil Engineering) a variant spelling of dyke1
2. (Geological Science) a variant spelling of dyke1

dike

(daɪk)
n
a variant spelling of dyke2

dike1

or dyke

(daɪk)

n., v. diked, dik•ing. n.
1. an embankment for controlling or holding back the waters of the sea or a river.
2. ditch.
3. a bank of earth formed of material being excavated.
5. an obstacle; barrier.
6.
a. a long, narrow, cross-cutting mass of igneous rock intruded into a fissure in older rock.
b. a similar mass of rock composed of other kinds of material, as sandstone.
v.t.
7. to furnish or drain with a dike.
8. to enclose, restrain, or protect by a dike.
[before 900; dik(e), Old English dīc < Old Norse dīki; akin to ditch]
dik′er, n.

dike2

(daɪk)

n.
dike′y, adj.

dike

(dīk)
A long mass of igneous rock that cuts across the structure of adjoining rock. It is often of a different composition than the rock it cuts across and can be useful in determining the age relationship between rocks.

dike


Past participle: diked
Gerund: diking

Imperative
dike
dike
Present
I dike
you dike
he/she/it dikes
we dike
you dike
they dike
Preterite
I diked
you diked
he/she/it diked
we diked
you diked
they diked
Present Continuous
I am diking
you are diking
he/she/it is diking
we are diking
you are diking
they are diking
Present Perfect
I have diked
you have diked
he/she/it has diked
we have diked
you have diked
they have diked
Past Continuous
I was diking
you were diking
he/she/it was diking
we were diking
you were diking
they were diking
Past Perfect
I had diked
you had diked
he/she/it had diked
we had diked
you had diked
they had diked
Future
I will dike
you will dike
he/she/it will dike
we will dike
you will dike
they will dike
Future Perfect
I will have diked
you will have diked
he/she/it will have diked
we will have diked
you will have diked
they will have diked
Future Continuous
I will be diking
you will be diking
he/she/it will be diking
we will be diking
you will be diking
they will be diking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been diking
you have been diking
he/she/it has been diking
we have been diking
you have been diking
they have been diking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been diking
you will have been diking
he/she/it will have been diking
we will have been diking
you will have been diking
they will have been diking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been diking
you had been diking
he/she/it had been diking
we had been diking
you had been diking
they had been diking
Conditional
I would dike
you would dike
he/she/it would dike
we would dike
you would dike
they would dike
Past Conditional
I would have diked
you would have diked
he/she/it would have diked
we would have diked
you would have diked
they would have diked

dike


click for a larger image
A vertical sheet of igneous rock that has intruded across older rocks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dike - (slang) offensive term for a lesbian who is noticeably masculine
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
gay woman, lesbian, tribade - a female homosexual
2.dike - a barrier constructed to contain the flow of water or to keep out the sea
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
milldam - dam to make a millpond to provide power for a water mill
weir - a low dam built across a stream to raise its level or divert its flow
Verb1.dike - enclose with a dike; "dike the land to protect it from water"
inclose, shut in, close in, enclose - surround completely; "Darkness enclosed him"; "They closed in the porch with a fence"
Translations
سَد، حاجِز
flóîgarîur, stíflugarîur
aizsprostsdambis

dyke,

dike

(daik) noun
an embankment built as a barrier against the sea etc.
References in classic literature ?
About halfway across the heath there had been a wide dike recently cut, and the earth from the cutting was cast up roughly on the other side.
He then somehow scrambled into the saddle, and with a "Gee up" and a clap on my sides with both his legs, he started on his journey, making a little circuit to avoid the dike.
On either side of him flowed a narrow dike filled with salt-water.
Be careful of the dikes," the station-master advised him.
It was an empty house which had been torn down by the gunpowder, and the grim old colour sergeant of the war was still teaching discipline to the miners of Iron Dike.
I remember the remains of one upon an island in a small lake near Lerwick, which at high tide communicates with the sea, the access to which is very ingenious, by means of a causeway or dike, about three or four inches under the surface of the water.
Among those were Major Loder (unattached), and Captain Rook (late of the Rifles), who might be seen any day on the Dike, smoking and staring at the women, and who speedily got an introduction to the hospitable board and select circle of Mr.
Two mornings after this little scene, although the day was rainy and gusty, and Amelia had had an exceedingly wakeful night, listening to the wind roaring, and pitying all travellers by land and by water, yet she got up early and insisted upon taking a walk on the Dike with Georgy; and there she paced as the rain beat into her face, and she looked out westward across the dark sea line and over the swollen billows which came tumbling and frothing to the shore.
The first fragment of their earthly possessions is a low natural dike of shingle, surmounted by a public path which runs parallel with the sea.
to, with his dikes and erigations, if there's any law to be brought to bear o' the right side.
On either side were dikes full of water bordered by osiers, and far away in the distance stood the towers of Emmet Priory with tall poplar trees around.
I took it to be rain, but it turned out to be only the murmur of the restless Neckar, tumbling over her dikes and dams far below, in the gorge.