dilapidated


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di·lap·i·dat·ed

 (dĭ-lăp′ĭ-dā′tĭd)
adj.
Having fallen into a state of disrepair or deterioration, as through neglect; broken-down and shabby.

dilapidated

(dɪˈlæpɪˌdeɪtɪd)
adj
falling to pieces or in a state of disrepair; shabby

di•lap•i•dat•ed

(dɪˈlæp ɪˌdeɪ tɪd)

adj.
fallen into partial ruin or decay, as from age, misuse, wear, or neglect.
[1800–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dilapidated - in deplorable conditiondilapidated - in deplorable condition; "a street of bedraggled tenements"; "a broken-down fence"; "a ramshackle old pier"; "a tumble-down shack"
damaged - harmed or injured or spoiled; "I won't buy damaged goods"; "the storm left a wake of badly damaged buildings"

dilapidated

dilapidated

adjective
1. Falling to ruin:
2. Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations
razpadel

dilapidated

[dɪˈlæpɪdeɪtɪd] ADJ [building] → desmoronado, ruinoso; [vehicle] → desvencijado

dilapidated

[dɪˈlæpɪdeɪtɪd] adj [building] → délabré(e)

dilapidated

adj buildingverfallen, heruntergekommen, baufällig; book, clothesschäbig

dilapidated

[dɪˈlæpɪˌdeɪtɪd] adj (building) → in pessime condizioni, cadente; (vehicle) → sgangherato/a, scassato/a
References in classic literature ?
Belated, and not innocently, one bitter winter's midnight, on the road running between two country towns, the blacksmith half-stupidly felt the deadly numbness stealing over him, and sought refuge in a leaning, dilapidated barn.
Grottos, cleverly managed, and massive terraces with dilapidated steps and rusty railings, gave a peculiar character to this lone retreat.
As the light looked so dim, and the place, for the time, looked quiet enough, and the dilapidated little wooden house itself looked as if it might have been carted here from the ruins of some burnt district, and as the swinging sign had a poverty-stricken sort of creak to it, I thought that here was the very spot for cheap lodgings, and the best of pea coffee.
Their name had been mixed up ages before with one of the greatest names of the century, and they lived now in Venice in obscurity, on very small means, unvisited, unapproachable, in a dilapidated old palace on an out-of-the-way canal: this was the substance of my friend's impression of them.
It is nothing smaller than the Crocodile Book, which is in rather a dilapidated condition by this time, with divers of the leaves torn and stitched across, but which Peggotty exhibits to the children as a precious relic.
I thought the windows of the sets of chambers into which those houses were divided, were in every stage of dilapidated blind and curtain, crippled flower-pot, cracked glass, dusty decay, and miserable makeshift; while To Let To Let To Let, glared at me from empty rooms, as if no new wretches ever came there, and the vengeance of the soul of Barnard were being slowly appeased by the gradual suicide of the present occupants and their unholy interment under the gravel.
Also, on each landing there is a medley of boxes, chairs, and dilapidated wardrobes; while the windows have had most of their panes shattered, and everywhere stand washtubs filled with dirt, litter, eggshells, and fish-bladders.
It was a dug-out, as ancient and dilapidated as its owner, and, in order to get into it without capsizing, Daughtry wet one leg to the ankle and the other leg to the knee.
So they followed and heard the music grow lively, saw the banners wave in the breeze again when the graveyard was passed, and watched the company file into the dilapidated old church that stood at the corner of three woodland roads.
The door of this deserted mansion Newman opened with a key which he took out of his hat--in which, by-the-bye, in consequence of the dilapidated state of his pockets, he deposited everything, and would most likely have carried his money if he had had any--and the coach being discharged, he led the way into the interior of the mansion.
I did not like to go quite to the front and stare in at the gate; but I paused beside the garden wall, and looked, and saw no change - except in one wing, where the broken windows and dilapidated roof had evidently been repaired, and where a thin wreath of smoke was curling up from the stack of chimneys.
What took them ten minutes by river, took Charles half an hour by land, and while they waited for him at the head of Lake Bennett they passed the time of day with several dilapidated old-timers on their way out.