dilatoriness


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dil·a·to·ry

 (dĭl′ə-tôr′ē)
adj.
1. Causing or intended to cause delay: dilatory tactics in the legislature.
2. Characterized by or given to delay or slowness: dilatory in his work habits. See Synonyms at slow.

[Middle English dilatorie, from Latin dīlātōrius, from dīlātor, delayer, from dīlātus, past participle of differre, to delay : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + lātus, carried; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

dil′a·to′ri·ly adv.
dil′a·to′ri·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dilatoriness - slowness as a consequence of not getting around to it
deliberateness, unhurriedness, slowness, deliberation - a rate demonstrating an absence of haste or hurry
Translations

dilatoriness

[ˈdɪlətərɪnɪs] N (frm) → tardanza f, demora f

dilatoriness

nLangsamkeit f, → Zögern nt(in doing sth etw zu tun)

dilatoriness

[ˈdɪlətrɪnɪs] n (frm) (of person) → lentezza
References in classic literature ?
With an income quite sufficient to their wants thus secured to them, they had nothing to wait for after Edward was in possession of the living, but the readiness of the house, to which Colonel Brandon, with an eager desire for the accommodation of Elinor, was making considerable improvements; and after waiting some time for their completion, after experiencing, as usual, a thousand disappointments and delays from the unaccountable dilatoriness of the workmen, Elinor, as usual, broke through the first positive resolution of not marrying till every thing was ready, and the ceremony took place in Barton church early in the autumn.
The winter, however, was spent cheerfully; and although the spring was uncommonly late, when it came its beauty compensated for its dilatoriness.
If no such cabal should exist, the mere diversity of views and opinions would alone be sufficient to tincture the exercise of the executive authority with a spirit of habitual feebleness and dilatoriness.
of habitual feebleness and dilatoriness." THE FEDERALIST NO.
While in theory the Court could seat the juror who swears to be able to decide the case impartially and whistle until contrary evidence emerges, there is limited benefit and great expense associated with such dilatoriness.
Norrell, who has been "tormented with the idea that he had betrayed English magic by his dilatoriness" (119), greets this revelation with surprise and guilt.
McWeeny is smart on Middlemarch, arguing that the novel expresses a tension between a realist fidelity to and sympathy for characters' everyday lives, on the one hand, and a sociological commitment to social complexity, on the other hand--a tension that the novel's own narrator identifies in the famous question "but why always Dorothea?" McWeeny's careful attention to narrative form produces convincing analyses of narrative and plot dilation (as when the narrator backs away from the characters being described) that put me in mind of Stephen Arata's "On Not Paying Attention" (Victorian Studies 2004) and Amy King's "Natural History and the Novel: Dilatoriness and Length and the Nineteenth-Century Novel of Everyday Life" (Novel 2009), although the latter is not mentioned in the book.
(1) the extent of the party's personal responsibility, (2) the prejudice to the adversary caused by the failure to meet scheduling orders and respond to discovery; (3) a history of dilatoriness; (4) whether the conduct of the party or the attorney was willful or in bad faith; (5) the effectiveness of sanctions other than dismissal, which entails an analysis of alternative sanctions; and (6) the meritoriousness of the claim or defense.
My recent research suggests however that dilatoriness may more properly refer to a deliberate delaying tactic as opposed to the more prosaic, chronic procrastination by which I have been beset.
Bhutto might prolong the Martial Law for the sake of his power keeping wishes but his dilatoriness provoked increasingly urgent clamour amongst the opposition (and even a small number of the PPP), the press and the public for the ending of Martial Law.
The Third Circuit looked at: "'(1) the party's personal responsibility; (2) the prejudice to the adversary; (3) a history of dilatoriness; (4) willfulness or bad faith; (5) the availability of alternative sanctions; and (6) the merit of the claim or defense.'" Id.
But even with the well-remarked US dilatoriness over green issues (California excepted), it's hard to think that some of the statements and imprecations will come as news to anyone.