diligent


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dil·i·gent

 (dĭl′ə-jənt)
adj.
Marked by persevering, painstaking effort.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dīligēns, dīligent-, present participle of dīligere, to esteem, love : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + legere, to choose; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

dil′i·gent·ly adv.
Synonyms: diligent, industrious, conscientious, assiduous, sedulous
These adjectives suggest steady attention and effort that is undertaken to accomplish something. Diligent connotes steady, meticulous attention to an ongoing job or task: "[They] have won international renown for their diligent efforts to track down software bugs" (Hiawatha Bray).
Industrious implies energetic and productive application, often to a large or important endeavor: "Madison's and Jefferson's vision of an agrarian republic made up largely of industrious farmers who marketed their burgeoning surpluses abroad" (Drew R. McCoy).
Conscientious carries with it the implication of energetic attentiveness springing from dutifulness or a sense of responsibility: "a studious, conscientious public servant authentically dedicated to improving the welfare of his fellow human beings" (Randall Bennett Woods).
Assiduous and the less common sedulous emphasize untiring exertion and an earnestness of purpose: "How do Olympians acquire [talent]? Were they born with it, or did they develop it through assiduous practice?" (Steve Olson)."the sedulous pursuit of legal and moral principles" (Ernest van den Haag).

diligent

(ˈdɪlɪdʒənt)
adj
1. careful and persevering in carrying out tasks or duties
2. carried out with care and perseverance: diligent work.
[C14: from Old French, from Latin dīligere to value, from dis- apart + legere to read]
ˈdiligently adv

dil•i•gent

(ˈdɪl ɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. constant and earnest in effort and application; attentive and persistent in doing something: a diligent student.
2. done or pursued with persevering attention; painstaking: a diligent search.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dīligent-, s. of dīligēns, present participle of dīligere to choose, like]
dil′i•gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.diligent - quietly and steadily persevering especially in detail or exactness; "a diligent (or patient) worker"; "with persevering (or patient) industry she revived the failing business"
patient - enduring trying circumstances with even temper or characterized by such endurance; "a patient smile"; "was patient with the children"; "an exact and patient scientist"; "please be patient"
2.diligent - characterized by care and perseverance in carrying out tasks; "a diligent detective investigates all clues"; "a diligent search of the files"
busy - actively or fully engaged or occupied; "busy with her work"; "a busy man"; "too busy to eat lunch"
careful - exercising caution or showing care or attention; "they were careful when crossing the busy street"; "be careful to keep her shoes clean"; "did very careful research"; "careful art restorers"; "careful of the rights of others"; "careful about one's behavior"
negligent - characterized by neglect and undue lack of concern; "negligent parents"; "negligent of detail"; "negligent in his correspondence"

diligent

diligent

adjective
Characterized by steady attention and effort:
Translations
مُجْتَهِد
pilnýpracovitý
flittigomhyggelig
iîinn
čaklscentīgsuzcītīgs
marljiv
çalışkangayretli

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒənt] ADJ [person] → diligente; [work, search] → concienzudo

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒənt] adj [worker, student] → appliqué(e), assidu(e); [work] → assidu(e)

diligent

adj person (in work etc) → fleißig; (= keen)eifrig; search, worksorgfältig, genau; to be diligent in doing somethingetw eifrig tun

diligent

[ˈdɪlɪdʒnt] adj (person) → diligente, attento/a; (work, search) → accurato/a, diligente

diligent

(ˈdilidʒənt) adjective
conscientious; hardworking. a diligent student.
ˈdiligently adverb
ˈdiligence noun
References in classic literature ?
Why, yes," said the President; "by diligent effort so many men must have saved a considerable number of lives.
Next morning I was afoot early, bent on my quest in right good earnest; for I had a remorseful feeling that I had not been sufficiently diligent the day before, had spent too much time in dreaming and moralising, in which opinion I am afraid the reader will agree.
For, thought Ahab, while even the highest earthly felicities ever have a certain unsignifying pettiness lurking in them, but, at bottom, all heart-woes, a mystic significance, and, in some men, an archangelic grandeur; so do their diligent tracings-out not belie the obvious deduction.
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
After all which, the tutors, or servants, ought to make diligent inquiry.
Now, upon the most diligent enquiry into the former lives of these two brothers, I find, besides the cursed and hellish maxim of policy above mentioned, another reason for the captain's conduct: the captain, besides what we have before said of him, was a man of great pride and fierceness, and had always treated his brother, who was of a different complexion, and greatly deficient in both these qualities, with the utmost air of superiority.
Another observation I must make, to the honour of a diligent application on one hand, and to the disgrace of a slothful, negligent, idle temper on the other, that when I came to the place, and viewed the several improvements, plantings, and management of the several little colonies, the two men had so far out-gone the three, that there was no comparison.
For, after a long series of military successes, or diligent and skilful labours, it is generally found that the more intelligent among the Artisan and Soldier classes manifest a slight increase of their third side or base, and a shrinkage of the two other sides.
A farmer had a faithful and diligent servant, who had worked hard for him three years, without having been paid any wages.
We only had one brief little season of heaven and heaven's sweet ecstasy and peace during all this long and diligent and acrimonious reproduction of the other place.
The visitor was Bitski, who served on various committees, frequented all the societies in Petersburg, and a passionate devotee of the new ideas and of Speranski, and a diligent Petersburg newsmonger- one of those men who choose their opinions like their clothes according to the fashion, but who for that very reason appear to be the warmest partisans.
That worthy student was now at Cambridge, where his most exemplary conduct and his diligent perseverance in the pursuit of learning carried him safely through, and eventually brought him with hard- earned honours, and an untarnished reputation, to the close of his collegiate career.