dimercaprol


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Related to dimercaprol: Succimer

di·mer·cap·rol

 (dī′mər-kăp′rôl, -rōl)
n.
A colorless oily viscous liquid, C3H8OS2, used as an antidote for poisoning caused by lewisite, organic arsenic compounds, and heavy metals including mercury and gold. Also called British anti-lewisite.

[di- + mercap(tan) + (p)r(opane) + -ol(e).]

dimercaprol

(ˌdaɪməˈkæprɒl)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless oily liquid with an offensive smell, used as an antidote to lewisite and similar toxic substances. Formula: CH2(SH)CH(SH)CH2OH. Also called: BAL
[C20: by shortening and altering from dimercaptopropanol]
Translations

di·mer·cap·rol

n. dimercaprol, antídoto usado en el envenenamiento producido por metales tales como oro y mercurio.
References in periodicals archive ?
(Chelating agents increase the urinary excretion of mercury [9] which includes thiol-based agents such as dimercaprol (British anti-Lewisite (BAL)), penicillamine, unithiol (2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulfonate (DMPS)), and succimer (dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA)).
Early treatment employed two agents in tandem: calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), which is given intravenously, and dimercaprol, which is injected into muscle tissue.
Researchers have now found that the drug, dimercaprol, removes the toxin by attacking certain chemical features of acrolein, neutralizing it for safe removal by the body.
anti-Lewisite or dimercaprol, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.
Chelation agents include the oral agent succimer, the intramuscular agent dimercaprol, and the intravenous agent CaEDTA [19-21].
Different chelating agents are used for particular metals although there are also pluripotent agents such as dimercaprol, aminophenoxyethane-acetic acid (BAPTA), deferoxamine, Ca, [Na.sub.2]-EDTA, and D-penicillamine.
Edetate calcium disodium, dimercaprol, and penicillamine are examples of commonly used chelation agents.
Copper chelators can be used in severe poisoning like dimercaprol, D-penicillamine, British Anti-Lewisite (BAL), Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetate (EDTA).
After the victim is decontaminated, BAL (Dimercaprol) 4-5 mg/kg IM should be used.
Chelating agents such as edetate calcium disodium (EDTA), sodium 2, 3-dimercaptopropane sulfonate (DMPS), and dimercaprol (BAL) have been reported (Table 1) [7-10].
There are six agents available to treat heavy metal (arsenic, gold, iron, lead, and mercury) intoxication: de-ferasirox (iron), deferoxamine (iron), dimercaprol (arsenic, gold, lead, and mercury), edetate calcium disodium (lead), penicillamine (copper and mercury), and succimer (lead).
BAL (chemical name: dimercaprol; 2,3-dimercaptopropanol) has been in use in the medical community for over 60 years, but since it causes serious side effects, it has now been.