diphtheria

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Related to diphtheria antitoxin: diphtheria toxoid

diph·the·ri·a

 (dĭf-thîr′ē-ə, dĭp-)
n.
An acute infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which infects mucous membranes of the throat, causing formation of a thick layer called the false membrane that can obstruct breathing, and producing a potent toxin that enters the bloodstream and causes systemic effects that include damage to the heart and nervous system.

[New Latin diphthēria, from French diphthérie, from Greek diphtherā, piece of hide, leather; see letter.]

diph′the·rit′ic (-thə-rĭt′ĭk), diph·ther′ic (-thĕr′ĭk), diph·the′ri·al adj.

diphtheria

(dɪpˈθɪərɪə; dɪf-)
n
(Pathology) an acute contagious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae, producing fever, severe prostration, and difficulty in breathing and swallowing as the result of swelling of the throat and formation of a false membrane
[C19: New Latin, from French diphthérie, from Greek diphthera leather; from the nature of the membrane]
diphˈtherial, diphtheritic, diphtheric adj
ˈdiphtheˌroid adj

diph•the•ri•a

(dɪfˈθɪər i ə, dɪp-)

n.
a febrile infectious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and characterized by the formation of a false membrane in the air passages, esp. the throat.
[1850–55; < French diphthérie < Greek diphthér(a) skin, leather + -ie -ia]
diph•the′ri•al, diph`the•rit′ic (-θəˈrɪt ɪk) adj.

diph·the·ri·a

(dĭf-thîr′ē-ə, dĭp-thîr′ē-ə)
A contagious disease caused by a bacterium and characterized by fever, swollen glands, and the formation of a membrane in the throat that prevents breathing. Diphtheria was once a leading cause of death in children, but now children are routinely immunized against it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diphtheria - acute contagious infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriaediphtheria - acute contagious infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae; marked by the formation of a false membrane in the throat and other air passages causing difficulty in breathing
contagion, contagious disease - any disease easily transmitted by contact
Translations
خُناق
záškrt
difteritis
diphtériediphthérie
torokgyík
barnaveiki
difteritas
difterija
záškrt

diphtheria

[dɪfˈθɪərɪə] Ndifteria f

diphtheria

[dɪpˈθɪəriə dɪfˈθɪəriə] ndiphtérie f

diphtheria

nDiphtherie f

diphtheria

[dɪfˈθɪərɪə] ndifterite f

diphtheria

(difˈθiəriə) noun
an infectious disease of the throat.

diph·the·ri·a

n. difteria, enfermedad contagiosa e infecciosa aguda, causada por el bacilo Corynebacterium diphtheriae (Klebs-Löffler), caracterizada por la formación de membranas falsas esp. en la garganta;
___ antitoxinantitoxina contra la ___.

diphtheria

n difteria
References in periodicals archive ?
In the absence of signs of toxin dissemination, none of the patients with cutaneous diphtheria received diphtheria antitoxin.
Other chapters explore the backgrounds of the palace Pekingese of the Empress Dowager Cixi; Togo and Balto, the dogsled heroes who brought the diphtheria antitoxin serum to Nome, Alaska; Buddy, North America's first guide dog; and military dogs such as Stubby, a rescue dog who ended up serving overseas in World War I.
True serum sickness was originally distinguished in 1905 as a self-limited illness that occurred in several patients after administration of equine diphtheria antitoxin.
Request for quotations: Supply of diphtheria antitoxin diagnostic for the needs of the regional public health services budget "Regional Clinical Psychiatric Hospital," the Ministry of Health of the Khabarovsk Territory
There were ample reasons [7-9] given in pediatric literature for diphtheria being a disease carrying higher mortality: high toxicity of diphtheria toxins, poor socioeconomic status of patients, and poor host response to diphtheria antitoxin are some of them.
A review of the international issues surrounding the availability and demand for diphtheria antitoxin for therapeutic use.
Clinical diagnosis of diphtheria was made, intravenous penicillin was started and she was transferred to MH Rawalpindi due to unavailability of diphtheria antitoxin.
Williams (1863-1954), developer of a diphtheria antitoxin and a method to diagnose rabies more rapidly; Alice Catherine Evans (1881-1975), a researcher in bacteriology and a promoter of the pasteurization of milk; Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori (1896-1957), a researcher in sugar metabolism and glycogen storage disorders; and Gladys Lounsbury Hobby (1910-1993), known for the study of antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis drugs.
Aside from administering diphtheria antitoxin, physicians could do very little for their patients except to recommend bed rest and a healthy diet.
Of particular interest was improving sewage treatment and water supplies, preventing tuberculosis through stronger milk regulations, improving provincial health legislation, taking public health directly to the public with innovative exhibits, and supporting efforts to provide essential biological products, such as smallpox vaccine and diphtheria antitoxin, as a public service.

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