diplospeak

diplospeak

(ˈdɪpləʊˌspiːk)
n
the polite and placatory language usually associated with diplomats
[from diplo(mat) + -speak]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
President Tshisekedi has been to Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda while President Zewde has been to Rwanda.The intentions of the visits are usually couched in diplospeak but at the Africa CEO Forum held in Kigali this past week, three of the region's presidents who attended Kagame, Tshisekedi and Zewde proffered there was more to the visits than bilateral relations and regional integration.
I came to the realization that we did not speak the same organizational language ("diplospeak" vs.
This was "diplospeak" as Ongeri told the committee that the full reasons for Kibaki's refusal to meet the British could not be revealed "in the full glare of cameras".
Then, he confuses a crucial, diplospeak nuance: He notes that the U.N.
In Iranian diplospeak that means acknowledging Iran's paramount position in Iraq and the Gulf region and backing off the confrontation over Iran's nuclear programme.
Like earlier resolutions, this one ended with the statement that "the Security Council decides to remain seized of this matter." In UN diplospeak, that means the issue remains on the Council's agenda, and under Council authority.
No "diplospeak" from this diplomat, he jokes with rookie observers and greets veterans with back-slaps.
But a more detailed study of diplospeak would find examples every year going back centuries.
They learn diplospeak mainly on the job, from more experienced American diplomats.
The unwritten rules of "diplospeak" are rarely broken by professional American diplomats, whether they are making public statements or having private conversations, because they believe Murrow's dictum that truthfulness is important for credibility and persuasiveness.
The Wikileaks revelations have thrown some diplospeak statements into sharp relief when they have allowed comparison between diplomats' classified communications to Washington with what they have said in public.