dipodic

dipodic

(daɪˈpɒdɪk)
adj
of or relating to a dipody or dipodies
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References in periodicals archive ?
43) On the level of prosody, Warren argues persuasively that Lindsay's signature technical breakthrough involved the use of dipodic meter, which has its roots in popular balladry and nursery rhymes, and is related to public performance and emphatic sing-song rhythms (87-89).
At the same time that the stanza outlines the characteristics of an appropriate response, it also imposes upon itself a set of constraints--ababb rhyme, iambic rhythm, patterns of line length (four lines of tetrameter followed by a dipodic line--a terminal abbreviation with effects comparable to those in "La Belle Dame sans Merci")--that artificially shape the language of the question.
The instability (or dipodic force) of this line is in fact oddly sophisticated, an oscillation between two fused meters (stressed and syllabic, the one we hear and the one we see).
A dipodic foot is one which is governed by a major, beating stress followed by a more or less flexible number (usually between zero and three) of unstressed syllables and another stressed syllable of secondary importance and prominence.
Building on Harold Whitehall's thesis, Edward Stephenson proposes that sprung rhythm is essentially dipodic.
Poets began to write more poems in triple and dipodic meters and to sprinkle extra syllables in the duple feet of iambic poems.
He cannot recognize that the Dylan Thomas poem he scans is syllabic, the Masefield one dipodic.