dipole


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di·pole

 (dī′pōl′)
n.
1. Physics A pair of separated electric charges or magnetic poles, of equal magnitude but of opposite sign or polarity.
2. Chemistry A molecule having two such charges or poles.
3. Electronics An antenna, usually fed from the center, consisting of two equal rods extending outward in a straight line.

di·po′lar adj.

dipole

(ˈdaɪˌpəʊl)
n
1. (General Physics) two electric charges or magnetic poles that have equal magnitudes but opposite signs and are separated by a small distance
2. (General Physics) a molecule in which the centre of positive charge does not coincide with the centre of negative charge
3. (Telecommunications) Also called: dipole aerial a directional radio or television aerial consisting of two equal lengths of metal wire or rods, with a connecting wire fixed between them in the form of a T
diˈpolar adj

di•pole

(ˈdaɪˌpoʊl)

n.
1. a pair of electric charges or magnetic poles of equal magnitude and opposite sign, set a finite distance apart.
2. a polar molecule.
3. Also called di′pole anten′na. an antenna of a transmitter or receiving set consisting of two equal rods extending in opposite direction from the connection to the lead-in wire.
[1910–15]
di•po′lar, adj.

di·pole

(dī′pōl′)
1. A pair of equal and opposite electric charges or magnetic poles, separated by a small distance.
2. A molecule having two such charges or poles.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dipole - a pair of equal and opposite electric charges or magnetic poles separated by a small distance
couple - (physics) something joined by two equal and opposite forces that act along parallel lines
electric dipole, electric doublet - a dipole with equal and opposite electric charges
magnetic dipole - a dipole with opposing magnetic poles
2.dipole - an aerial half a wavelength long consisting of two rods connected to a transmission line at the center
antenna, transmitting aerial, aerial - an electrical device that sends or receives radio or television signals
Translations
dipól

dipole

[ˈdaɪˌpəʊl] N
1. (Elec) → dipolo m
2. (TV, Rad) (also dipole aerial) → antena f dipolar, dipolar f

dipole

nDipol m

dipole

[ˈdaɪˌpəʊl] (Elec) ndipolo
dipole aerial → antenna a dipolo
References in periodicals archive ?
This spontaneous electric dipole moment can be repeatedly transitioned between two or more equivalent states or directions upon application of an external electric field -- a property utilised in numerous ferroelectric technologies, for example nano-electronic computer memory, RFID cards, medical ultrasound transducers, infrared cameras, submarine sonar, vibration and pressure sensors, and precision actuators.
Silver ink was then added to those lines, which created a dipole element, thus bestowing its RF filtering capabilities.
Moreover, Higher dipole moment of 1,3dibromonaphthalene (2) than 1,4-dibomonaphthalene (3) supported the synthesis of 1,3dibromonaphthalene (2) properly.
Although the eddy-forced envelope soliton model can describe a life cycle of atmospheric dipole blocking [7, 8], the KdV-type soliton cannot represent the time variation or life of atmospheric dipole blocking [2, 3].
Recent demonstrations in liquid-metal reconfigurable antennas include monopole [6, 7], dipole [8], planar inverted F [9], Yagi-Uda [10-12], patch [13, 14], and slot [15] antennas.
In this paper we consider a different situation where the magnetic field is not anymore externally generated but is generated from inside the sample, e.g., an infinitesimal magnetic dipole placed at the center of a mesoscopic sphere.
A previous study [1] considered the ratio of fields at a tip and a contacting surface calculated in the dipole approximation in static limit (Rayleigh approximation) for the case of tip-source.
In this paper, we present an alternative proposal to the understanding and interpretation of the dipole moment of diatomic molecules, present content in the curriculum of physical chemistry and quantum chemistry disciplines in undergraduate chemistry courses.
This analogy is based on the formation of magnetic dipoles, like electric dipoles, but consisting of two point fictitious magnetic charges (hereinafter--the dipole model of magnetization).
This motion is called the CMB dipole. But the velocity (630 km/s, or 1.4 million mph) is about double what it should be, if Shapley and the other clusters were solely responsible.
A folded dipole radiates a pattern similar to a single dipole, but has an input impedance that can be changed as a function of the size of the conductors.