direct question


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Related to direct question: Indirect question

direct question

n
(Grammar) a question asked in direct speech, such as Why did you come?. Compare indirect question
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
It was a matter upon which he was reticent, and with persons of his kind a direct question is never very discreet.
Of course such a direct question, put in a very categorical way, caused the questioned to blush, if it did not induce her to smile.
Maggie turned rather pale; this direct question seemed not easy to answer.
"I changee," the little old cook explained, with anxious eyes to please and placate, in response to Daughtry's direct question. "All the time like that, changee, plentee changee.
And so it was that her direct question left him floundering in a sea of embarrassment, for to tell her the truth now would gain him no favor in her eyes, while it certainly would lay him open to the suspicion and distrust of her father should he learn of it.
But anyway I like a direct question. In this vice at least there is something permanent, founded indeed upon nature and not dependent on fantasy, something present in the blood like an ever-burning ember, for ever setting one on fire and, maybe, not to be quickly extinguished, even with years.
Rochester living at Thornfield Hall now?" I asked, knowing, of course, what the answer would be, but yet desirous of deferring the direct question as to where he really was.
He really suspected that Arthur wanted to tell him something, and thought of smoothing the way for him by this direct question. But he was mistaken.
"No, sir." Ransome was startled by the direct question; but, after a pause, he added equably: "He told me this morning, sir, that he was sorry he had to bury our late captain right in the ship's way, as one may say, out of the Gulf."
"With great pleasure!" answered the Mummy, after surveying me leisurely through his eye-glass -- for it was the first time I had ventured to address him a direct question.
"They will lose all respect if they are allowed to be so free and easy; besides it is not proper for them," he declared at last, in answer to a direct question from the prince.
He never spoke except in reply to a direct question, which more often than not had to be repeated before it could attract his attention.