dirgelike

dirgelike

(ˈdɜːdʒˌlaɪk)
adj
slow and gloomy, like a dirge
References in classic literature ?
At the opening notes of the melody--a slow, wailing, dirgelike air--the cats rose, and circled round their mistress, marching to the tune.
The next two songs were the dirgelike This Is Your Land and Soul Crying Out, a song that just wouldn't take off.
They're] almost dirgelike and plaintive," added the Jesuit who composed the entrance hymn "Laudate Dominum (Praise the Lord)" and communion song "Iesu, Panis Vitae/Tinapay ng Buhay.
Moving slowly in eighths, dirgelike and very soft, the piano stays in the bass clef with only a brief excursion into the treble clef with thick chords at the climax of the song, returning to the bass clef for the final lines.
The work's dirgelike MIDI sound track reinforces a sense of solitude, of wander-ing.
This dirgelike vignette may become, for readers, a prototype of soul-fortifying rites to be performed for a newly-dead beloved.
Monk begins by playing a dirgelike piano ostinato that provides a sonic platform over which she ululates with ever-increasing dynamic intensity.
Even the mellower numbers like the blues smoker "Tears of Joy" and the dirgelike "Little Rock Star"--a hopeful ode to self-destructive rock stars everywhere--seem to portray this new perspective.
The slow dirgelike opening sets the mood, but it eventually opens up to a lovely, sunny middle section with vaguely Scottish, pastoral inflections.
Tuesday, he returns with a renewed determination, and organizes a school choir, whose dispirited versions of ``Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer'' and ``Amazing Grace'' are almost dirgelike.
The dirgelike poem begins: "Fifteen years have passed.
In the dirgelike song--which features Earle's cigs-and-whiskey voice over sparse, guitar-driven instrumentation and is written in the first person--Earle's Walker hopes if he dies in service to Allah, "I'll rise up to the sky/Just like Jesus, peace be upon him.