dirk


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dirk

 (dûrk)
n.
A dagger.
tr.v. dirked, dirk·ing, dirks
To stab with a dirk.

[Scots durk.]

dirk

(dɜːk)
n
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a dagger esp as formerly worn by Scottish Highlanders
vb (tr)
(Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) to stab with a dirk
[C16: from Scottish durk, perhaps from German Dolch dagger]

dirk

(dɜrk)

n.
1. a dagger.
v.t.
2. to stab with a dirk.
[1595–1605]

dirk


Past participle: dirked
Gerund: dirking

Imperative
dirk
dirk
Present
I dirk
you dirk
he/she/it dirks
we dirk
you dirk
they dirk
Preterite
I dirked
you dirked
he/she/it dirked
we dirked
you dirked
they dirked
Present Continuous
I am dirking
you are dirking
he/she/it is dirking
we are dirking
you are dirking
they are dirking
Present Perfect
I have dirked
you have dirked
he/she/it has dirked
we have dirked
you have dirked
they have dirked
Past Continuous
I was dirking
you were dirking
he/she/it was dirking
we were dirking
you were dirking
they were dirking
Past Perfect
I had dirked
you had dirked
he/she/it had dirked
we had dirked
you had dirked
they had dirked
Future
I will dirk
you will dirk
he/she/it will dirk
we will dirk
you will dirk
they will dirk
Future Perfect
I will have dirked
you will have dirked
he/she/it will have dirked
we will have dirked
you will have dirked
they will have dirked
Future Continuous
I will be dirking
you will be dirking
he/she/it will be dirking
we will be dirking
you will be dirking
they will be dirking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dirking
you have been dirking
he/she/it has been dirking
we have been dirking
you have been dirking
they have been dirking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dirking
you will have been dirking
he/she/it will have been dirking
we will have been dirking
you will have been dirking
they will have been dirking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dirking
you had been dirking
he/she/it had been dirking
we had been dirking
you had been dirking
they had been dirking
Conditional
I would dirk
you would dirk
he/she/it would dirk
we would dirk
you would dirk
they would dirk
Past Conditional
I would have dirked
you would have dirked
he/she/it would have dirked
we would have dirked
you would have dirked
they would have dirked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dirk - a relatively long dagger with a straight bladedirk - a relatively long dagger with a straight blade
dagger, sticker - a short knife with a pointed blade used for piercing or stabbing
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
Translations

dirk

[dɜːk] N (Scot) → puñal m

dirk

n (Scot) → Dolch m
References in classic literature ?
It was because I felt this that Dirk Stroeve was not to me, as to others, merely an object of ridicule.
Finally he took a wrong turn and ran a few steps past me, towards the hamlet, crying, "Johnny, Black Dog, Dirk," and other names, "you won't leave old Pew, mates--not old Pew
Watching my chance, I stole five cans of the milk, and that night, when it was Louis's watch on deck, I traded them with him for a dirk as lean and cruel-looking as Thomas Mugridge's vegetable knife.
Still calmly, though my heart was going pitapat, I pulled out Louis's dirk and began to whet it on the stone.
Also I carried the dirk in a sheath at my hip, sailor-fashion, and maintained toward Thomas Mugridge a constant attitude which was composed of equal parts of domineering, insult, and contempt.
He turned his eyes toward the speaker; it was Dirk Waldron.
Dirk Waldron was seated beside him; Wolfert grasped his hand, pointed after his daughter, and for the first time since his illness broke the silence he had maintained.
The ancient mansion of his forefathers was still kept up, but, instead of being a little yellow-fronted Dutch house in a garden, it now stood boldly in the midst of a street, the grand home of the neighborhood; for Wolfert enlarged it with a wing on each side, and a cupola or tea room on top, where he might climb up and smoke his pipe in hot weather, and in the course of time the whole mansion was overrun by the chubby-faced progeny of Amy Webber and Dirk Waldron.
As the light gleamed among them, Sam saw that they were five stout, desperate-looking fellows, in red woolen caps, with a leader in a three-cornered hat, and that some of them were armed with dirks, or long knives, and pistols.
Alan drew a dirk, which he held in his left hand in case they should run in under his sword.
Toward evening on the second day, what does he do but blandly fetch out a dirk from inside his robe!
I persuaded him to throw the dirk away; and it was as easy as persuading a child to give up some bright fresh new way of killing itself.