dirty bomb

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dirty bomb

a device using conventional explosives to send nuclear material through the air

dirty bomb

n
(Military) informal a bomb made from nuclear waste combined with conventional explosives that is capable of spreading radioactive material over a very wide area
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dirty bomb - an atom bomb that leaves considerable radioactive contamination
A-bomb, atom bomb, atomic bomb, fission bomb, plutonium bomb - a nuclear weapon in which enormous energy is released by nuclear fission (splitting the nuclei of a heavy element like uranium 235 or plutonium 239)
References in periodicals archive ?
Coordinated suicide bombings in Brussels nine days earlier had stoked special anxiety about dirty bombs, because two perpetrators had secretly surveilled a senior researcher in a Belgian radioactive isotope program as he came and went from his home.
Most of the facilities for the research and development of chemical weapons and dirty bombs are sunk below the surface of the secret 1.
It's effectively an early warning system against dirty bombs.
Even though 100 percent scanning was mandated by Congress in 2006 as part of the SAFE Port Act, Hahn said that only 3 percent of cargo is currently being scanned today, even though dirty bombs may be smuggled into ports in cargo containers on ships.
He continued, "We'll find out what dirty bombs are and what they do.
Tariq, who has had his passport cancelled by the Home Office, told fellow militants via social media that jihadist dirty bombs are now a reality.
DESTRUCTIVE Tariq, 37, who has had his passport cancelled by the Home Office, told fellow militants via a social media account that jihadist dirty bombs are now a reality.
The Army has got the numbers and the expertise to deal with threats like the Tokyo underground attack or dirty bombs.
We have looked much more closely at chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear materials which could be used to make dirty bombs and how we can stop them being brought in," he said.
Six years after Padilla arrived, the United States faces vulnerabilities when it comes to dirty bombs.
Home Secretary Jacqui Smith yesterday warned that the threat of terror attacks in public places, including from radioactive dirty bombs, was "growing".
Last night, Home Secretary Jacqui Smith said: "We are talking about attacks on crowded public places, we are talking about the use, potentially, of dirty bombs.