disabling


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dis·a·ble

 (dĭs-ā′bəl)
tr.v. dis·a·bled, dis·a·bling, dis·a·bles
1. To deprive of capability or effectiveness, especially to impair the physical abilities of.
2. Law To render legally incapable of performing an act.

dis·a′ble·ment n.
dis·a′bling adj.
dis·a′bling·ly adv.

disabling

(dɪˈseɪbəlɪŋ)
adj
1. (Medicine) causing disability or an inability to do something: skin ulcers which are disfiguring and sometimes disabling.
2. (Social Welfare) causing disability or an inability to do something: skin ulcers which are disfiguring and sometimes disabling.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disabling - that cripples or disables or incapacitates; "a crippling injury"
unhealthful - detrimental to good health; "unhealthful air pollution"; "unhealthful conditions in old apartments with peeling lead-based paint"
2.disabling - depriving of legal right; rendering legally disqualified; "certain disabling restrictions disqualified him for citizenship"
enabling - providing legal power or sanction; "an enabling resolution"; "enabling power"
Translations

disabling

[dɪˈseɪbəlɪŋ] adj [injury, condition] → handicapant(e)

disabling

adj incapacitante, discapacitante
References in classic literature ?
If affection lead a man to favor the less worthy in desert, let him do it, without depraving or disabling the better deserver.
The black's next shot was more accurate, striking my flier full upon the prow and exploding with the instant of contact, ripping wide open the bow buoyancy tanks and disabling the engine.
Under the process-of-nature rule for policy provisions requiring disability within a certain time frame ("immediately," "from the date of the accident," or "within 90 days"), the onset of disability relates back to the time of the accident (if the disabling injury arises directly from the accident during the course of nature).That is, when the process of nature eventually brings the injured person to a state of total disability.
In a rating decision dated May 24, 1946, Kressler was granted service connection for wounds to the left scapula (shoulder) muscle group at 30 percent disabling, the right forearm at 20 percent disabling and muscle group XV (thigh) at 20 percent disabling for a combined rating of 60 percent.
In each of these historical periods, the deaf were doomed to exclusion because they did not neatly fit into any set definition of "normal." For many historians, these observations will seem too broad and overtly sociological, but the authors do capture the "disabling process" in uncanny ways.
Counselors are encouraged to assess how vocational handicaps secondary to a disabling problem can affect a client over his or her "worklife" and to adopt a life-span approach to career decision making of people with disabilities.
Some damage can exist also at the higher levels but this is not as prevalent as at the more provocative and disabling levels.
More recently, Quinn (1994) suggests that women with disabling conditions are at a particular disadvantage because they have to overcome societal views regarding individuals who are different, and also navigate the experience with limited role-models to assist the process.
In Milwaukee, Wisconsin Myrna Cohen, who has worked for years in shopping center management, was stricken with a disabling neurological condition that left her in a wheelchair.
Disabling conditions frequently are associated with severe oral disease and dysfunction of the craniofacial complex.
Joe (Eds.), Images of the disabled, disabling images, (pp.
Many people function independently despite a "disabling" condition.