disablism


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Related to disablism: ableism

disablism

n
(Sociology) discrimination against disabled people
disˈablist n, adj
References in periodicals archive ?
Neste sentido, cria-se o neologismo disablism para denunciar a cultura da normalidade que oprime e discrimina os portadores de impedimentos corporais (17).
Dan Goodley, Dis/ability Studies: Theorising Disablism and Ableism 21 (2014) ("Ableis[m] .
The topics include the affirmation model, alienation, bodies, disability arts, discrimination, the disabled people's movement, education, feminist disability studies, harassment and hate crime, the historical construction of disability, independent living, international perspectives, media representations, the medical model, the personal tragedy model, psycho-emotional disablism, rights and legislation, service users' organizations, the social model, Traveller identity, and welfare reform.
The article provides new insights into the way Commonwealth authority and conservative sanctioned paternalism interacts with disablism and functions to perpetuate disabling categories over time.
In Disability Rhetoric, Jay Dolmage disables the history of rhetoric and notes, "When I use the term disabled here, I gesture both to pejorative disablism and to the idea that disability can be a positive thing" (81).
Among the topics are developing an affirmative model of disability and impairment, psycho-emotional disablism and internalized oppression, exploring the social model of disability, barriers to inclusion experienced by visually impaired people, and designing inclusive environments and the significance of universal design.
For instance, problems of racism are discussed by Bertrand and Mullainathan (2004), age discrimination by Neumark and Stock (1999), and disablism (disability discrimination) by Baldwin and Johnson (1994), among others.
functionalism which sets impairment and disability as synonymous concepts; interpretivism which explores the meaning of impairment and disability as they are constructed through interpretations and actions of individuals; radical humanism, where disability and impairment are cultural signifiers constructed through culture and ideology; and radical structuralism, where disability or, more properly, disablism refers to the socio-political, economic and structural exclusion of people with impairments.
Holt confirms that young people with socio-emotional differences and EBD tend to experience entrenched disablism in the educational context, such as labelling, diagnostic processes, exclusion and marginalisation in school institutional spaces, and routinised contrasting behavioural norms.
Disablism is alive and well and should be challenged by every decent minded citizen, along with all forms of discrimination.
Within disability studies, the concept of community care is central to the process of disablism (i.