disaccharidase


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di·sac·cha·ri·dase

 (dī-săk′ər-ĭ-dăs′, -dāz′)
n.
An enzyme, such as invertase or lactase, that catalyzes the hydrolysis of disaccharides to monosaccharides.

disaccharidase

(daɪˈsækərɪˌdeɪs; daɪˈsækərɪˌdeɪz)
n
a type of digestive enzyme that breaks disaccharides down into monosaccharides
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disaccharidase - an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of disaccharides into monosaccharides
enzyme - any of several complex proteins that are produced by cells and act as catalysts in specific biochemical reactions
invertase, saccharase, sucrase - an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sucrose into glucose and fructose
Lactaid, lactase - any of a group of enzymes (trade name Lactaid) that hydrolyze lactose to glucose and galactose
References in periodicals archive ?
Inhibitory effects of extractives from leaves of Morus alba on human and rat small intestinal disaccharidase activity.
This implication should not be surprising given the EM evidence of enterocyte and microvillus damage (62), elevated 1-FABP levels (63,64), deficits in disaccharidase (65), and anti-TG2 antibodies along epithelial and microvascular basement membranes (66), together with the continued activation of chemokines and their respective genes at this early phase of mucosal reorganization (67,68).
Correlation of intestinal disaccharidase activities with the C/T-13910 variant and age.
Disaccharidase Deficiencies in Children with Chronic Abdominal Pain
Other conditions, including coeliac disease (CD), which result in small intestinal injury may cause reduction of disaccharidase (DS) activities.
Ikeda, "Effect of an intestinal disaccharidase inhibitor (AO-128) on obesity and diabetes," The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol.
Watanabe et al., "Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of Caco-2 cells," Journal of Nutrition, vol.
The relationship between morphology and disaccharidase activity in ischemia-reperfusion injured intestine.
Acetic acid has been shown to delay gastric emptying in healthy subjects [10] and patients with type 1 diabetes [11]; alternatively, acetic acid may inhibit disaccharidase activity in the small intestine and suppress the enteral carbohydrate absorption [12].
In addition, treatment with berberine enhanced insulin-mediated glycogen synthesis and restored insulin inhibition of triglyceride secretion (Lou et al., 2011) and suppressing disaccharidase activities (Liu et al.,2010).Our data showed that E.