disamenity

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disamenity

(ˌdɪsəˈmiːnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ities
(Social Welfare) formal a disadvantage
References in periodicals archive ?
local disamenities in terms of noise and crime (Newell and Raimi, 2015).
Open Space and Potential Local Disamenities on Residential Property
The measures have significantly reduced public drunkenness and related disamenities.
For example, a larger population may contribute to disamenities such as traffic congestion and pollution.
(2) This strategy builds upon an extensive literature that assesses the benefits and costs of public programs that change local amenities and disamenities (e.g., housing characteristics, local labor market, school quality, demographics, and environment) through the lens of the housing market.
Plant nutrients are essential for healthy aquatic ecosystems, but human activities (agriculture, fossil fuel combustion, industrial processes, human settlements) can increase nutrients (especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P)) above "natural levels," leading to reduced biodiversity, diminished productivity of commercial and sports fisheries, loss of waterfowl habitat, various disamenities from algal blooms, and--in some cases--risks to human health from elevated nitrates in drinking water and toxic algae.
(18) By moving to these early suburbs, higher-income residents could escape the disamenities of 19th century urban life, including periodic epidemics of influenza and yellow fever.
There has been increased interest in the sociological research as it relates to local opposition of HVOTLs and other perceived energy infrastructure disamenities. As efforts to curb carbon emissions and decentralize the power grid continue, research will continue into the effects, if any, of these possible disamenities on property values.
other researchers discuss the negative effect of "visual disamenities" on property values within a short distance of the structure or property upon which the visual disamenity is located (Krueger.
The price effects are due to competition (i.e., an additional house for sale) and disamenities. Competition effects are important in all parts of a geographic area, while disamenity effects are found only in high-density, low-price neighborhoods.