disamenity

disamenity

(ˌdɪsəˈmiːnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ities
(Social Welfare) formal a disadvantage
References in periodicals archive ?
where d is the amount of consumption (or equivalent) when not working and c is the utility disamenity of working.
The majority of these costs "are borne by sex offenders' neighbors" since living near a sex offender causes a "substantial 'disamenity' value." Id.
CV surveys often estimate a monetary value for respondents' willingness to pay (WTP) for the preservation or removal of a certain environmental amenity or disamenity. This has not been a particularly active area of power line research since 2010, but it is of interest because of the frequent--and controversial--use of CV research in environmental litigation.
Conversely, higher income households are willing to pay more to live further away from affordable housing developments in areas where such properties are viewed as a disamenity." (118)
"Valuing the Visual Disamenity of Offshore Wind Power Projects at Varying Distances from the Shore: An Application on the Delaware Shoreline." html Economics.
Regarding the impact on nearby property, one possibility is that foreclosed properties are a disamenity in that they can be an eyesore (because of a lack of maintenance) or induce crime and vandalism.
Moreover, ease of building can be an amenity, and difficulty of building can be a disamenity. According to Fischel, the relative challenge of building will be incorporated in real estate prices because homeowners value their right to build on their property or be able to sell to a party who would do so.
(120) In fact, the environmental justice movement originates in disputes over the placement of solid waste facilities, a particular kind of environmental disamenity, in communities with predominantly African-American, low-wealth residents.
If property owners (or potential buyers) perceive the 2004-2005 storm season as providing information that the hurricane risk (a change in a disamenity) was underestimated for high-hazard areas, then this new information about risk should result in an immediate decrease in house prices for these areas.
Each is measured on a one-to-five scale, with a value of five representing a strong presence of the particular job disamenity. (Figure 10.)
And following a report by the London School of Economics (LSE) villagers fear the potential disamenity will cause house prices to fall.
Professor David Maddison, who co-authored the report The Valuation of Landfill Disamenity in Birmingham said looking at house prices was one way of measuring the negative impact landfill sites have around the country, generally.