triage

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triage

sorting according to quality; the assignment of degrees of urgency to decide the order of treatment of injuries, illnesses, etc.
Not to be confused with:
triad – a group of three, as notes in a chord

tri·age

 (trē-äzh′, trē′äzh′)
n.
1. A process for sorting injured people into groups based on their need for or likely benefit from immediate medical treatment. Triage is used in hospital emergency rooms, on battlefields, and at disaster sites when limited medical resources must be allocated.
2. A system used to allocate a scarce commodity, such as food, only to those capable of deriving the greatest benefit from it.
3. A process in which things are ranked in terms of importance or priority: "For millions of Americans, each week becomes a stressful triage between work and home that leaves them feeling guilty, exhausted and angry" (Jill Smolowe).
tr.v. tri·aged, tri·ag·ing, tri·ag·es
To sort or allocate by triage: triaged the patients according to their symptoms.

[French, from trier, to sort, from Old French, to pick out; see try.]

triage

(ˈtriːˌɑːʒ; ˌtriːˈɑːʒ; ˈtraɪ-)
n
1. (Medicine) (in a hospital) the principle or practice of sorting emergency patients into categories of priority for treatment
2. (Medicine) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
3. (Military) the principle or practice of sorting casualties in battle or disaster into categories of priority for treatment
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle or practice of allocating limited resources, as of food or foreign aid, on a basis of expediency rather than according to moral principles or the needs of the recipients
[C18 (in the sense: sorting (goods) according to quality): from French; see try, -age]

tri•age

(triˈɑʒ)

n., adj., v. -aged, ag•ing. n.
1. the process of sorting victims, as of a battle or disaster, to determine priority of medical treatment, with highest priority usu. given to those having the greatest likelihood of survival.
2. the determination of priorities for action in an emergency.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or performing the task of triage: a triage officer.
v.t.
4. to act on or in by triage: to triage a crisis.
[1925–30; < French: sorting]

triage

The evaluation and classification of casualties for purposes of treatment and evacuation. It consists of the immediate sorting of patients according to type and seriousness of injury, and likelihood of survival, and the establishment of priority for treatment and evacuation to assure medical care of the greatest benefit to the largest number.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.triage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or foodtriage - sorting and allocating aid on the basis of need for or likely benefit from medical treatment or food
sorting - grouping by class or kind or size
Translations
triagieren

triage

[ˈtriːɑːʒ] n (in hospital)triage m

tri·age

Fr. triage, clasificación y evaluación de víctimas en acontecimientos catastróficos para establecer prioridades según la urgencia del tratamiento y aumentar así el número de sobrevivientes.

triage

n triage m, evaluación f inicial de pacientes de urgencia para establecer prioridades
References in periodicals archive ?
The congress will focus on key topics that include public health and emergency medicine, critical care, trauma and injury prevention, paediatric emergency medicine and preventive child health, health promotion and health protection, pre-hospital and disaster medicine, education and quality in emergency medicine and emergency nursing, to name a few.
Humaid Al Qutami, director-general of DHA, said the congress will focus on key topics that include public health and emergency medicine, critical care, trauma and injury prevention, paediatric emergency medicine and preventive child health, health promotion and health protection, pre-hospital and disaster medicine, education and quality in emergency medicine and emergency nursing.
Among the speakers are University of Ottawa emergency medicine professor and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute senior scientist Dr Ian Stiell and Department of Emergency Medicine UZ Brussel and Research Group on Emergency and Disaster Medicine chairman Professor Ives Hubloue.
The agreement also envisions cooperation in academic research of disaster medicine and sharing of data analysis between both sides.
DIMRC works to ensure that the disaster medicine and public health emergency workforce has access to the literature, both from peer-reviewed journals indexed in PubMed and to vital non-journal resources.
Titled 21st National Health Sciences Research Symposium, Emergency Care: Time and Life Matter, the event brought together a large number of national and international specialists in emergency and acute care medicine, disaster medicine, emergency medical services as well as professionals from other disciplines that interface with emergency care.
To create a cross-cutting and multi-disciplinary experience, the event will bring together national and international specialists in emergency and acute care medicine, disaster medicine, emergency medical services as well as professionals from other disciplines that interface with emergency care.
Some of the themes that will be dwelt on include military and disaster medicine, mechanism and ways of handling emergencies, both military and natural disasters.
The three-day conference will be attended by more than 500 participants from inside and outside the Sultanate, during which more than 25 working papers will be presented, divided into (8) main themes dealing with a number of aspects related to military medicine and disaster medicine, like the mechanism and ways of handling emergencies, both military and natural disasters.
Physicians are not as prepared to handle emergencies as they should or could be, according to a 2015 study in Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, with less than half of practicing physicians interviewed reporting that they felt prepared to handle a natural disaster.
The research was published in the journal Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness.( ANI )

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