disbudding


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dis·bud

 (dĭs-bŭd′)
tr.v. dis·bud·ded, dis·bud·ding, dis·buds
1. To remove buds from (a plant) to promote better blooms from the remaining buds or control the shape of the plant.
2. To prevent the growth of horns on (livestock) by destroying or removing newly developing horns.

disbudding

The selective removal of some immature buds to encourage those that remain to produce better quality flowers or fruit.
References in periodicals archive ?
With nursery production, symptoms develop at the site of wounds made by disbudding, at the base of rooted cuttings, and at grafts; however, in many cases, the infected plants remain symptomless until frost or other physical damage initiates the disease.
She covers basic aspects like design and maintenance, bed preparation, planting and renovation, pests and diseases, staking, and division, and pruning aspects like deadheading, cutting back, pinching, disbudding, thinning, deadleafing, and preparing for winter or spring, followed by an alphabetical encyclopedia of perennials, with information on their physical characteristics, blooms, zones, pruning, other maintenance, and related plants.
The study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of electric disbudding and surgical incision method for removal of horn buds in calves within one month of age.
Blindness can be caused by vitamin A deficiency in the goat's diet, tapeworm, polioencephalomalacia (thiamine deficiency) or other neurological disease, optic nerve damage, collapse of the eyeball, overheating of the brain from disbudding or various other conditions.
The program focuses on all aspects of the production and development process from traceability, cattle housing and transportation to environmental protection, disbudding and castration.
After this, it is just a case of tying, staking, feeding, watering, disbudding, pest and disease watching and preparing for shows, so it is easy, isn't it
Disbudding can be done up to the day of the show, but the later it is done the more noticeable the scars will be.
There is even a chapter called Manipulating the Seasons, which is full of useful advice on deadheading, successional sowing, disbudding, treating perennials as annuals and selective pruning, which can be used to prolong, delay or repeat flowering, depending on what is desired.