discobolus


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discobolus

(dɪsˈkɒbələs) or

discobolos

n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) (in classical Greece) a discus thrower
2. (Art Terms) a statue of a discus thrower
[C18: from Latin, from Greek diskobolos, from diskos discus + -bolos, from ballein to throw]

discobolus

1. a discus thrower.
2. cap., italics. the famous 5th-century B.C. statue by Myron of a discus thrower.
See also: Athletics
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"Wan hunder an' forty-nine an' a half - bad luck to ye, Discobolus!" said Long Jack.
discobolus continue to successfully spawn, rear, recruit to adulthood, and maintain numerical dominance over nonnative fishes in the lower perennial corridor of the Little Colorado River (LCR) in Arizona (Douglas and Marsh, 1996, 1998; Robinson and Childs, 2001; Stone and Gorman, 2006; Figs.
(13) As Webster surely knew, Myron of Eleutherae was the ancient Greek sculptor of bronze whom Pliny records as having produced some of the most famous statues of antiquity, including the lauded Discobolus. See Pliny, Natural History, trans.
He explains, for example, that for Czech readers, Holub's use of the word soudruh ("comrade") in the poem "Discobolus" carries a "general meaning" that speaks "about the human situation regardless of communism" (133).
The original Greek statue of Discobolus, "Discus Thrower," has been lost, but there are Roman copies.
The symbol of Myron's Discobolus (Discus Thrower) sets the tone for Diagono watches.
Status and structure of two populations of the bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus) in the Weber River, Utah.
At Fresno High School, she not only reproduced sketches of the Gibson girls for her friends, she also worked in her freehand drawing classes from plaster casts of the Discobolus and the Winged Victory.
Zoffany drew close inspiration from classical models; Cook's pose is similar to that of The Dying Gaul, while The Townley Discobolus provided a model for the central Hawaiian warrior.
For example, the flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), bluehead sucker (Catostomus discobolus), and white sucker (Catostomus commersonii) comprised 65-75% of the total catch in the upper Colorado River (Carter and others 1986).
It shows the Ancient Greek statue of a discus thrower called Discobolus, with London's Big Ben in the background.
(Classicism was nationalistically inflected: In France it could mean Poussin and David as well as antiquity, in Italy Giotto and Piero as well as imperial Rome, in Germany Durer and Cranach as well as ancient Greece.) Though less overt in wall texts and catalogue essays, the second thesis is suggested by the installation, which begins with Bust of a Woman, Arms Raised, 1922, a statuesque painting by Picasso in his classical mood, and concludes with the prologue to Olympia (1936-38), Leni Riefenstahl's spectacular film of the Berlin Olympics, in which, among other sequences that advance a spiritual affinity between ancient Greeks and modern Germans, the Discobolus of Myron (ca.