disconfirm

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Related to disconfirmatory: Conclusive evidence

disconfirm

(ˌdɪskənˈfɜːm)
vb
(tr) (of a fact or argument) to suggest that a hypothesis is wrong or ill-formulated
ˌdisconfirˈmation n

dis•con•firm

(ˌdɪs kənˈfɜrm)

v.t.
to prove to be invalid.
[1935–40]

disconfirm


Past participle: disconfirmed
Gerund: disconfirming

Imperative
disconfirm
disconfirm
Present
I disconfirm
you disconfirm
he/she/it disconfirms
we disconfirm
you disconfirm
they disconfirm
Preterite
I disconfirmed
you disconfirmed
he/she/it disconfirmed
we disconfirmed
you disconfirmed
they disconfirmed
Present Continuous
I am disconfirming
you are disconfirming
he/she/it is disconfirming
we are disconfirming
you are disconfirming
they are disconfirming
Present Perfect
I have disconfirmed
you have disconfirmed
he/she/it has disconfirmed
we have disconfirmed
you have disconfirmed
they have disconfirmed
Past Continuous
I was disconfirming
you were disconfirming
he/she/it was disconfirming
we were disconfirming
you were disconfirming
they were disconfirming
Past Perfect
I had disconfirmed
you had disconfirmed
he/she/it had disconfirmed
we had disconfirmed
you had disconfirmed
they had disconfirmed
Future
I will disconfirm
you will disconfirm
he/she/it will disconfirm
we will disconfirm
you will disconfirm
they will disconfirm
Future Perfect
I will have disconfirmed
you will have disconfirmed
he/she/it will have disconfirmed
we will have disconfirmed
you will have disconfirmed
they will have disconfirmed
Future Continuous
I will be disconfirming
you will be disconfirming
he/she/it will be disconfirming
we will be disconfirming
you will be disconfirming
they will be disconfirming
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disconfirming
you have been disconfirming
he/she/it has been disconfirming
we have been disconfirming
you have been disconfirming
they have been disconfirming
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disconfirming
you will have been disconfirming
he/she/it will have been disconfirming
we will have been disconfirming
you will have been disconfirming
they will have been disconfirming
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disconfirming
you had been disconfirming
he/she/it had been disconfirming
we had been disconfirming
you had been disconfirming
they had been disconfirming
Conditional
I would disconfirm
you would disconfirm
he/she/it would disconfirm
we would disconfirm
you would disconfirm
they would disconfirm
Past Conditional
I would have disconfirmed
you would have disconfirmed
he/she/it would have disconfirmed
we would have disconfirmed
you would have disconfirmed
they would have disconfirmed
References in periodicals archive ?
Several cognitive mechanisms have been proposed to explain the maintenance of delusions in schizophrenia, including bias against disconfirmatory evidence, bias in favor of confirmatory evidence, and safety-seeking behaviors.
The first three pieces were designed to be loosely confirmatory, the latter three to be more decidedly disconfirmatory.
See Sheff, Biasing Brands, supra note 4, at 1287-95 (discussing the persistence of consumer biases even in the face of disconfirmatory evidence and even when consumers are warned of their tendency toward biased decisionmaking); id.
But for researchers to restrict an approach to a purely disconfirmatory agenda would be throwing the baby out with the bath water, or at least wilfully not checking to see if the baby is in the bath first, because we just don't like children.
Sawatsky also believed in maintaining a militant neutrality in his approach, always keeping an open mind and allowing for disconfirmatory evidence to be heard.
the availability heuristic), (88) the tendency to be overconfident in one's judgments, particularly when uncertainty is involved (the overconfidence bias), (89) the tendency to rely only on confirmatory evidence, while ignoring disconfirmatory evidence (the confirmation trap bias), (90) and the reputational influences that cause Groupthink (the pressure to conform to group norms).
Accordingly, this study used multilevel modeling to analyze 772 confirmatory and disconfirmatory questions generated by 97 mental health counselors in training.
On the basis of the work reviewed, we conceive of hypothesis testing in terms of two process components and their respective strategies: (1) information search, which can incorporate confirmatory or disconfirmatory strategies and (2) intended use of the information, which may involve biased or unbiased strategies.
When a state violates an existing rule of customary international law, it undoubtedly is 'guilty' of an illegal act, but the illegal act itself becomes a disconfirmatory instance of the underlying rule.
Ridley (1995) encouraged counselors to use both confirmatory as well as disconfirmatory strategies so that they deliberately seek to validate as well as invalidate their clinical judgments.
Once counselors formulate negative hypotheses regarding clients, they may demonstrate confirmatory bias, seeking confirmatory information while paying less attention to disconfirmatory information, even in the face of contradictory evidence (Strohmer & Shivy, 1994; Strohmer, Shivy, & Chiodo, 1990).
These findings are consistent with two recently published accounts showing that practitioners rarely reconsider their decisions or retrace the steps that led them to their decisions (Murdach, 1995) and that social workers prefer confirmatory information strategies to disconfirmatory ones by a ratio of more than four to one (Osmo & Rosen, 2002).