discordant

(redirected from discordances)
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dis·cor·dant

 (dĭ-skôr′dnt)
adj.
1. Not being in accord; conflicting.
2. Disagreeable in sound; harsh or dissonant.

dis·cor′dan·cy n.
dis·cor′dant·ly adv.

discordant

(dɪsˈkɔːdənt)
adj
1. at variance; disagreeing
2. harsh in sound; inharmonious
disˈcordantly adv

dis•cord•ant

(dɪsˈkɔr dnt)

adj.
1. being at variance; disagreeing; incongruous.
2. disagreeable to the ear; dissonant; harsh.
[1250–1300; Middle English discordaunt < Anglo-French < Latin]
dis•cord′ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.discordant - not in agreement or harmony; "views discordant with present-day ideas"
accordant - being in agreement or harmony; often followed by `with'; "a place perfectly accordant with man's nature"-Thomas Hardy
2.discordant - lacking in harmony
inharmonious, unharmonious - not in harmony

discordant

adjective
1. disagreeing, conflicting, clashing, different, opposite, contrary, at odds, contradictory, inconsistent, incompatible, incongruous, divergent He displays attitudes and conduct discordant with his culture.

discordant

adjective
1. Devoid of harmony and accord:
2. Made up of parts or qualities that are disparate or otherwise markedly lacking in consistency:
3. Characterized by unpleasant discordance of sound:
Translations
disonančnínesouhlasnýv neshodě
uharmonisk
epäsointuinenriitasointuinen
disszonánsdiszharmonikus
ósamstæîur; ósamhljóîa
disonantnýnezhodný
ahenksizuyumsuz

discordant

[dɪsˈkɔːdənt] ADJ [ideas, opinions] → discorde, opuesto; [sound] → disonante

discordant

[dɪsˈkɔːrdənt] adj
[groups, opinions] → discordant(e), dissonant(e)
to strike a discordant note (= seem out of place) → détonner
(MUSIC)dissonant(e)

discordant

adj opinions, coloursnicht miteinander harmonierend; soundmisstönend; meeting, atmosphereunharmonisch; (Mus) → disharmonisch; to strike a discordant note (fig)einen falschen Ton anschlagen

discordant

[dɪsˈkɔːdnt] adj (gen) → discordante; (sound) → dissonante, stonato/a

discord

(ˈdiskoːd) noun
1. disagreement or quarrelling.
2. in music, a group of notes played together which give a jarring sound.
disˈcordant adjective
References in classic literature ?
"You don't know what you're talkin' about." Sarah paused to laugh in mirthless discordance. "Watch for the babies to come.
As they sit listening to the solemn swell, the confidence of last night rises in young Edwin Drood's mind, and he thinks how unlike this music is to that discordance.
Our study showed that UGFNAs were associated with a significantly decreased number of discordances, specifically major discordances, between FNA and surgical/flow cytometry follow-up diagnosis (major discordance rate of 9.5% [26 of 273] with palpation versus only 2.7% [6 of 222] with ultrasound guidance; P = .002).
Posturography evaluation can also include intraposturographic discordances, where the scores on more difficult Sensory Organization tests (SOT) (conditions 5 and 6) are better than those on the simpler, less challenging conditions (conditions 1 and 2).
The fact that it deals with the discordances between life in modern day America and the expectations of a traditional Islamic family also makes for interesting reading: it gives an insight into what any young man (or woman!) has to deal with when trying to make sense of who they are and what's important; I found seeing things from Tariq's perspective a real eye-opener.
D'autres reformes permettront d'eliminer des discordances non moins importantes.
Meer's work often focuses on the contradictions and discordances that arise between the existing customs and the modernisation that is taking place in Oman.
Les discordances s'amplifiaient davantage avec chaque etape prise par le Conseil Supreme des Forces armees.
These differences are the result of two causes: the influence of regulatory elements, such as different DNA copy-number-variation profiles caused by de novo CNV changes [Bruder at al., 2008] or the influence of epigenetic mechanisms that modulate the expression of the genes and cause phenotype discordances [Gringras and Chen, 2001; Fraga et al., 2005].
The authors note that the form of the detective novel is a perfect starting point for an exploration of the discordances of the detective's world.
"All the friction and continuous discordances in the Yemeni domain are caused by two main problems," Al-Ansy said.
The claim that the earth is approximately 6,000 years old is supported from biblical interpretation and from four areas of scientific studies: helium diffusion in zircons, radiohalos in granites, isochron discordances, and the presence of trace amounts of carbon-14 (C-14) in pre-Cambrian material.