discouragement


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dis·cour·age·ment

 (dĭ-skûr′ĭj-mənt, -skŭr′-)
n.
1.
a. The act of discouraging.
b. The condition of being discouraged.
2. Something that discourages; a deterrent.

dis•cour•age•ment

(dɪˈskɜr ɪdʒ mənt, -ˈskʌr-)

n.
1. an act or instance of discouraging.
2. the state of being discouraged.
3. something that discourages; a deterrent.
[1555–65; < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discouragement - the feeling of despair in the face of obstaclesdiscouragement - the feeling of despair in the face of obstacles
despair - the feeling that everything is wrong and nothing will turn out well; "they moaned in despair and dismay"; "one harsh word would send her into the depths of despair"
intimidation - the feeling of discouragement in the face of someone's superior fame or wealth or status etc.
2.discouragement - the expression of opposition and disapproval
disapproval - the expression of disapproval
disheartenment - a communication that leaves you disheartened or daunted
dissuasion - a communication that dissuades you
determent, deterrence, intimidation - a communication that makes you afraid to try something
encouragement - the expression of approval and support
3.discouragement - the act of discouraging; "the discouragement of petty theft"
deterrence - the act or process of discouraging actions or preventing occurrences by instilling fear or doubt or anxiety

discouragement

noun
1. deterrent, opposition, obstacle, curb, check, setback, restraint, constraint, impediment, hindrance, damper, disincentive Uncertainty is one of the major discouragements to investment.
2. depression, disappointment, despair, pessimism, hopelessness, despondency, loss of confidence, dejection, discomfiture, low spirits, downheartedness There's a sense of discouragement creeping into the workforce.
Translations
odrazováníztráta odvahy
modarbejdelsemodvirken
elkedvetlenítés
kjarkleysi; úrtölur
cesaretini kırma

discouragement

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒmənt] N
1. (= depression) → desánimo m, desaliento m
2. (= dissuasion) → disuasión f
3. (= deterrent) → impedimento m
it's a real discouragement to progresses un verdadero impedimento para el progreso

discouragement

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒmənt] n
(= depression) → découragement m
(= disincentive) to act as a discouragement to sb → dissuader qn

discouragement

n
(= depression)Mutlosigkeit f
(= dissuasion)Abraten nt; (with success) → Abbringen nt
(= deterrence, hindrance)Abhaltung f; (of friendship)Verhinderung f; (of praise)Abwehr f
(= discouraging thing) to be a discouragemententmutigend sein

discouragement

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒmənt] n (dissuasion) → disapprovazione f; (depression) → scoraggiamento
to act as a discouragement to → scoraggiare

discourage

(disˈkaridʒ) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) verb
1. to take away the confidence, hope etc of. His lack of success discouraged him.
2. to try to prevent (by showing disapproval etc). She discouraged all his attempts to get to know her.
3. (with from) to persuade against. The rain discouraged him from going camping.
disˈcouragement noun
References in classic literature ?
THE SECOND class of powers, lodged in the general government, consists of those which regulate the intercourse with foreign nations, to wit: to make treaties; to send and receive ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; to regulate foreign commerce, including a power to prohibit, after the year 1808, the importation of slaves, and to lay an intermediate duty of ten dollars per head, as a discouragement to such importations.
When a farmer once got into the habit of going to Cutter, it was like gambling or the lottery; in an hour of discouragement he went back.
The hope of impunity is a strong incitement to sedition; the dread of punishment, a proportionably strong discouragement to it.
While he spoke, Emma's mind was most busy, and, with all the wonderful velocity of thought, had been ableand yet without losing a word to catch and comprehend the exact truth of the whole; to see that Harriet's hopes had been entirely groundless, a mistake, a delusion, as complete a delusion as any of her ownthat Harriet was nothing; that she was every thing herself; that what she had been saying relative to Harriet had been all taken as the language of her own feelings; and that her agitation, her doubts, her reluctance, her discouragement, had been all received as discouragement from herself.
He is a most extraordinary young man, and whatever be the event, you must feel that you have created an attachment of no common character; though, young as you are, and little acquainted with the transient, varying, unsteady nature of love, as it generally exists, you cannot be struck as I am with all that is wonderful in a perseverance of this sort against discouragement.
This young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill magnates, who run the San Francisco Stock Exchange, much as more humble adventurers, in the corner of some public park at home, may be seen to perform the simple artifice of pea and thimble: for their own profit, that is to say, and the discouragement of public gambling.
Dorothea, submitting uneasily to this discouragement, went with Celia into the library, which was her usual drawing-room.
Then he turned back still running, stopping only when he reached the park gate, where he again consulted his watch and then put it away in his pocket, shrugging his shoulders with a gesture of discouragement.
He has had too much all-round discouragement to meet.
Robert had pursued a system of lessons almost daily; and he was nearly at the point of discouragement in realizing the futility of his efforts.
ADAM understood Dinah's haste to go away, and drew hope rather than discouragement from it.
D'Artagnan, with his neck elongated, his legs stretched out, and his hands hanging listlessly, looked like a statue of discouragement.